Monthly Archives: April, 2010

NECA Washington Watch

TRS Ex Parte—CG Docket No. 10-51 4/28/10—CSDVRS met with CGB and DRO staff to discuss a new rate structure for VRS.  CSDVRS said the FCC’s decision to move to a tiered multi-year rate was the right decision, but also said the methodology could be improved.  CSDCRS proposed adding a fourth and fifth tier to the […]

Interpreted show at Nazareth

Please share if appropriate with other deaf people: I saw the play today with an interpreter. It was deeply moving. They informed me afterwards that they have an interpreter (same one) assigned for this Sunday as well. Just show up half hour early to buy tickets. Nazareth Box office asked me to encourage more deaf […]

Harrisburg offers to take deaf students

Associated Press – April 30, 2010 8:55 AM ET HARRISBURG, S.D. (AP) – The Harrisburg School District is offering to take the five remaining students at the South Dakota School for the Deaf. The Board of Regents, which oversees the Siou To see the rest of article  click on http://www.kcautv.com/Global/story.asp?S=12403594

Fundraising for DWR

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Gloucester candidates take questions from deaf voters

Sign language interpreters were used to help with communication BBC News United Kingdom General election candidates for Gloucester have been taking questions from deaf people in the city with the help of interpreters. The panel included Conservative Richard Graham, the Liberal Democrat’s Jeremy Hilton and Parmjit Dhanda, who is defending the seat for Labour. Organisers […]

UM student wins $10,000 prize for video

WITHOUT A SOUND Bangor Daily News (Maine) 4/30/10 | By Jessica Bloch BDN Staff BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY JESSICA BLOCH Samantha Danis ORONO, Maine — It seems fitting that on the night Samantha Danis found out she’d won a national award for her video documentary work, she was out to dinner with a group […]

Two Rochester School for the Deaf students won first-place

Democrat and Chronicle Rochester, NY Two Rochester School for the Deaf students won first-place in their team division of the 2010 Rochester Institute of Technology National Science Fair for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Middle and High School Students, held March 26-27on the RIT campus. Eighth-grader Allison Higgins of Leicester and seventh-grader Madilyn Smith of […]

Baseball team featured in ‘USA Today’; attends White House ceremony with New York Yankees

President Barack Obama greets Baseball Head Coach Curtis Pride at the White House. Photo by Sam Atkinson. Members of the baseball team and Athletics staff stand outside the White House’s East Room during their visit. Photo by Sam Atkinson. In less than 24 hours, the Gallaudet baseball team met President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe […]

Gallaudet University baseball team invited to the White House, witness New York Yankees ceremony with President Obama

Apr 26, 2010 Gallaudet University baseball team invited to the White House, witness New York Yankees ceremony with President Obama WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Gallaudet University baseball team had a front row seat to history on Monday afternoon as the Bison were special guest of U.S. President Barack Obama to attend a ceremony to recognize […]

Rockville, MD – Managing the Stress Related to Hearing Loss

Managing the Stress Related to Hearing Loss Speaker: Dr. Samuel Trychin psychologist, educator, author Saturday, May 15, 2010 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Rockville Memorial Library 21 Maryland Avenue Rockville, MD 20850 Registration required. Online registration available at www.montgomerycountymd.gov/library For more information about this program, contact: Joan Kleinrock at <mailto:> Presented by Hearing Loss […]

Healing Waters

I sink into the water.

Outside, at the hot springs, the air is cool and river still. It smells like sulfur, but after a few minutes I don’t notice. I’m simply lost in the “healing waters.” That’s what they are called because supposedly the minerals in the hot springs help with a number of ailments. Personally, I enjoy the way the heat releases the tension in my body. I especially like soaking my feet – they cramp easily. I also like the heat around the middle of my body – a source of pain between a miscarriage, a surgery, and fertility frustrations over the past 12 months.

I lean back against the stone wall of the bath and watch.

There is a man standing under a waterfall. The water thuds against his back. What is he healing? Tight shoulders? Work stress? Or something deeper . . . the loss of a family member or friend?

In another pool there is a woman with her eyes closed. Maybe she is washing away the pain of divorce. Or abuse. Or a dog named Marley.

I don’t know. I’m just guessing. But when I start thinking about all the different types of “loss” people deal with, it’s clear we all need healing. One of the professors at the university I attended in Southern California just lost his house in the fires. One of my friends just gave birth, a joyful event . . . and a loss of personal time.

Loss of age . . . loss of a job . . . loss of a breast . . . loss of mental agility . . . loss of a city after a move . . . loss of a child who goes off to college . . . and on and on and on it goes.

I read a paragraph in a book the other day about the importance of taking time to heal. The author said that when we step back and heal ourselves we become aware of a world full of people in need. My time of retreat is coming to a close. I hope I don’t go back home and get too wrapped up in schedules and deadlines and the frustrations of city traffic. I hope I can heed the author’s advice and help heal the world in little personal ways. Š

Special Occasions

The street is cleared of traffic, the tents are up, and the vendors are selling summer squash, cherries, and herbs. It’s the second week this season the farmers’ market has been open in town, and my husband escapes from the office so we can enjoy lunch together and wander by the open-air booths. We buy bread (baked from scratch) from one of our favorite vendors and discuss what we can grill, cook, and drink over the next few days.

As we walk, I start thinking about how I’ll be spending a lot more time at farmers’ markets this summer than I have in the past – it’s easier to find local, sustainably-grown food here than at the grocery stores. I’ve always enjoyed farmers’ markets, but I’ve tended to reserve them for “special occasions.” When I lived in Los Angeles my friends and I would load up with market goodies before going to a concert at the Hollywood Bowl, or for a picnic at the beach, or if we had guests coming to town.

With over 3500 farmers’ markets in the United States (visit LocalHarvest.org to find one near you) there are plenty here on the east coast where I currently live. I’ll be visiting more of them over the next few days to get a feel for the ones I prefer, talk to vendors, and gather local meat, eggs, and more fruit and veggies. I know I have my work cut out for me this summer as I learn how to prepare meals, can tomatoes, and make my own salad dressing. But taking the first step and creating the intent to eat clean is one of the biggest hurdles. Besides, it feels good to realize that what used to be a “special occasion” will now be a part of daily life.

Happy

The other day, I was in a “blah” mood due to my seasonal affective disorder (self-diagnosed). To snap out of it, I came up with a list of ten activities that are fun. Not just enjoyable, but playful and lively. The kind of activities that make me happy, happy, happy.

10 Fun Activities
1. Rollerblading (I can’t help but grin like a fool whem I blade – I absolutely love it more than just about anything)
2. Dinner out with my husband
3. Waterskiing
4. Downhill Skiing
5. Watching a good romantic comedy
6. Tennis
7. Jumping on a trampoline
8. Throwing a Frisbee with my dog (she can leap in the air and catch it)
9. Riding rapids in a river
10. Snorkeling around coral reefs

Reviewing my list, it dawned on my how many were linked to physical activity – things that get my blood flowing. (Yoga isn’t on there because while I do enjoy it – love it, actually – I think of it as more of a calming practice.) I don’t know where the trampoline came from – that one just popped into my head. Well, I’m so getting a mini tramp for my bedroom. When it’s cold and windy and rainy I’ll get some physical exercise and make myself laugh while I’m at it.

Bounce. Bounce. Bounce. Š

Yoga Wagon

Kerplunk!

I fell off the yoga wagon.

Haven’t been to a class in over two weeks. My life is shifting right now, causing my schedule to bumble around. First, my spouse and I are preparing to move to Virginia. It’s just a hop, skip, and a jump away from where we are now, but we still need to pack up and load every dish, book, and piece of furniture. I’ve been donating stuff and shredding files like crazy. I started playing tennis again, and I’m adding a writing class as well as a writing workshop to my week. Not to mention my freelancing is picking up, I’ve been spending more time in the kitchen due to Clean Eating, and my husband and I are dealing with the emotional turmoil of fertility issues as we try to start a family. The yoga studio is a good 30-minute drive from my house. No wonder I haven’t been making it over there lately.

I remember when I was a law student I was particularly stressed out one semester. At the time I was debating adopting a puppy. “Try to minimize the stress in your life,” my parents cautioned. I adopted the puppy anyway, but I thought it was good advice. Even though I’m excited about the events in my life (moving, taking a class, more work assignments), change takes its toll. What can I do to minimize the stress?

I let go of a column that I enjoyed writing but that didn’t pay. I asked my husband to take over some of the dinner duties (grilled salmon, yum!). My parents are going to help with the move. Also, there is a yoga studio that is closer to my current place. I’ll try it out next time. I feel calmer already.Š

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