Monthly Archives: July, 2010

From White House

From the White House, President Obama’s message on ADA

NECA Washington Watch

Agenda 7/29/10—The FCC issued the agenda for its August 5th Open Meeting. The Commission will consider a Report and Order and FNPRM that enables consumers with hearing loss to enjoy the benefits offered by modern advanced telephone voice communication devices.

VIA NAD, FCC’s Video

FCC created a video celebrating ADA.

Submitted by NAD on Fri, 07/30/2010 – 13:43 On July 26, 2010, the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Twenty-first Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act (H.R. 3101) with a vote of 348 to 23. The NAD thanks U.S. Representative Ed Markey (D-MA), for authoring, […]

Deaf, blind promised a better film experience Theater chains add captions, narration New technology allows the deaf to read captions projected onto a reflecting device they can screw into a cup holder. (Wgbh) Josh Pearson, who has been blind since shortly after he was born, has always loved going to the movies

Oralism leaves deaf children behind in our society

THE OLYMPIAN | • Published July 30, 2010 Years ago, a friend of mine told the story of his son’s birth. He recalled the doctor somberly gave the news that their son was deaf. The doctor was astonished when the parents hugged and rejoiced. They explained to the befuddled doctor that because he was deaf, […]

Updated Flyer from RDMC

Shugoll Research is currently conducting a research study with people 18 and older who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.  

Published: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Khalil AlHajal | The Flint Journal FLINT — A deaf woman who struggled for two weeks to communicate with doctors and nurses as she underwent tests and was diagnosed with kidney cancer now is being provided with sign language interpreters 24 hours a day, according to family members who fought […]

Thursday, July 29, 2010  02:54 AM By Bill Bush THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH The Ohio School Facilities Commission will have to rebid contracts to replace the state’s schools for the blind and deaf after bids came in at least 41percent over the estimated cost of construction.

Male Impotence – How Serious Is It?

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Male impotence or erectile dysfunction (ED) is not exactly a serious condition when put in the context of life-threatening.  No, male impotence is in no way this serious.  However, what makes this condition serious for every man that has it is that part of what makes them a man and mostly their main asset that provides them satisfaction and relief from sexual urges is no longer functioning properly.  This is because penile erection is needed to perform sexual intercourse successfully.  Otherwise, vaginal penetration is not possible.

The truth is male impotence is not a rare condition as nearly one in five men will have or experience it with some varying points of severity.  The problem with this condition though is that, like it or not, if you are a man who is very sexually active, it is an embarrassing condition.  In fact, most men with ED prefer not to discuss it with other men, even friends for that matter.  They usually keep the condition either to just themselves, or with their partners and personal doctor.  There have even been cases where the breakup of couples is due to the male not being able to provide the sexual needs of the female.  Such is the dilemma of men with ED. Read more…

A Time to Feast

I’m hanging out with my parents when my dad sees me frantically rubbing my thumbs against the palms of my hands.

“Are you nervous?” he asks.

“Yeah,” I say.

He wants to know why. How to explain?

My parents have been visiting the past few days. I haven’t seen them in over six months. It’s the longest period of time we’ve ever been apart (even when I lived in Europe after college I saw them at least every four months). The past few days have been one big party. We’ve eaten red meat and fried foods. We’ve had Grasshoppers (ice cream and alcohol) and cookies. I think I munched on a vegetable in there somewhere – yes, I steamed spinach one night – but other than that, I can’t say I’ve been practicing “mindful eating” since Saturday. And my home yoga regime? Completely cut off once my parents arrived (although my mom saw my mat, which was rolled out on the floor, and she practiced sun salutations).

“I’m not sure what to blog about for Wasa this week,” I finally say to my dad.

“Well, let’s think,” he says.

“I’m supposed to blog about yoga and mindful eating, but I’m not inspired given my eating habits and lack of yoga practice,” I explain.

My dad is silent for awhile. “You could talk about how yoga is important for old people like me,” he finally says. “As people age, they are at an increased risk of falling. So write in your blog that yoga is important for balance and to do yoga with a Wasa cracker.”

“Uh, okay. Thanks,” I say.

“Just trying to help,” he says.

My mom chimes in too. “Oh, I know,” she says. “Blog about the fact that we bought a juicer.”

It’s true. My parents read the Wasa blog and were inspired to buy a juicer.

“Last week we made peach juice with vodka,” my mom says. “It was delicious!” She pauses. “Am I missing the point?”

Well, I do wish they would make vegetable juice instead, but maybe I’m the one who is missing the point. As I drop them off at the airport, I know what I’m going to blog about: A Time to Feast. This week we’ve hit up good restaurants and had fun cooking in too. We played cards and watched baseball and talked, all over scones for breakfast and steaks for dinner. It was a reunion. A celebration.  A time to enjoy life. Not that we couldn’t have done that over Brussels sprouts and brown rice, but eating well most of the time makes it easier to allow the exceptions. Not to mention, those “exceptions” are much appreciated.

Open My Heart

How many times have I been in Dandasana (Staff Pose) during a yoga class and listened to the teacher say, Open your chest? Same with Trikonasana (Triangle Pose) and many, many other poses.

My friend and fellow blogger Michelle of Full Soul Ahead was in a guided meditation when she heard the teacher say, “We often hunch our shoulders as a way to protect our hearts.” Michelle blogged about the symbolic meaning of that tendency over here: Open Heart. A beautiful post and well worth checking out.

Not that long ago I was reading Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert and came across the passage where a recovering addict had prayed continuously that God would open his heart. When the man was rushed to the hospital for surgery, he remembered thinking, God, I didn’t mean literally! (The story goes something like that – I don’t have the book with me to look it up).

Anyway. Open my heart, God. What a great prayer. I realized today that it’s so much easier to “open my heart” when things are going well. When life is good, my work is being published, my husband and I are laughing together, and the sun is shining, it’s so easy to take a big breath and stand up tall and let my chest expand and be graceful and appreciative and joyful towards others and towards the world.

But when dark times come…oh, those are the moments where I tend to get frustrated or angry and want to quit. But I think maybe it’s during those times when the heart needs to open up and grow most of all.

Do I Knead a Bread Machine?

Bread.

The staple of life.

Now that I’ve gotten used to making my own fresh vegetable juice, I’m thinking of bread. I recall reading Animal, Vegetable, Miracle a few months ago and coming across a passage by the author’s husband (Steven Hopp) who makes a fresh loaf practically everyday.

He says, “I know you’ve got one around somewhere: maybe in the closet. Or on the kitchen counter, so dusty nobody remembers it’s there. A bread machine.”

A bread machine? Nope, don’t have one in the closet or on the counter or anywhere. I’m lucky if I can find a spatula in our kitchen. During a party this spring, I was talking with the host’s mother. She’s in her late 80s and makes her own bread. I told her I wanted to learn so I could make homemade pizza dough, whole wheat, pumpernickel, etc.

“But I don’t have a bread machine,” I said.

She practically fell out of her chair laughing. I guess if you really know how to make bread the old fashioned way, you knead the dough. By hand. For a long time.

“You have to feel the dough to make sure it’s right,” she said.

Call me crazy, but kneading dough by hand actually sounds fun. I think I’ll try it (although I have no idea what it’s supposed to “feel” like, so I’ll have to wing that part). In the meantime, I’ll keep my eye out at garage sales for someone else’s barely-used, dusty bread machine.

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