Monthly Archives: August, 2010

Northern Virginia Sign Language Club Invites you to our 2010 Friday Silent Game Nights

Kennedy Center Theater for Young Audiences

Northern Virginia Association of the Deaf General Meeting and 2009 R.I.A. Award Ceremony *Thursday, September 9, 7:30 P.M.*

WHAM Reported by: Sean Carroll Email: Last Update: 6:28 am Henrietta, NY – Anthony “Tony” Wallace lived in Rochester for about decade; first as a standout wrestler for R.I.T. and later as a coach and campus safety officer.  Wallace, friends and colleagues say, made a habit out of achieving goals he set for himself.  At the […]

UPI Published: Aug. 30, 2010 at 7:17 PM HOONAH, Alaska, Aug. 30 (UPI) — A suspect was taken into custody Monday after a standoff with police and charged with killing two Alaska police officers, one of whom was deaf, police said. The standoff ended at 9:30 a.m. when John Marvin Jr., 45, walked out of […]

Greetings friends! This is a reminder of upcoming events on Sept 4.  All day FUN! District of Columbia Area Black Deaf Advocates hosts LABOR DAY COOKOUT/CRUISE COOKOUT Saturday, September 4, 2010 KDES Pavilion Area 800 Florida Ave, NE Washington, DC 10:00 am to 6pm Come for great food, games and fun!!! Lunch 12:00 noon – […]

Bloomberg Business Week Lip movements when signing connect to spoken language rather than to signs, researchers find MONDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) — Although people move their mouths when they communicate in sign language, scientists have debated whether the lip movements were part of signing or whether they’re connected directly to spoken language.

Here it is Deaf Cornholer’s…. Spread the First Annual Ohio Deaf Cornhole Association Big Event, October 9, 2010 news to everyone… Let me know if interested buying Woodgamz products…. Map behind flyer… Come out to play or social… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . […]

Suspect in Alaska police killings surrenders

WHEC Rochester, NY Posted at: 08/30/2010 3:26 PM A man accused of killing two police officers in a small Alaska village surrendered to authorities Monday. John Marvin Jr. turned himself in shortly before 10 a.m., according to a local official in the southeast Alaska village of Hoonah.

Wasa with Smoked Salmon and Goat Cheese

Ingredients

2 tablespoons goat cheese
1 tablespoon capers
1 tablespoon chopped chives
2 slices smoked salmon
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 teaspoon lemon juice
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 tablespoons mixed baby salad greens
2 pieces WASA Light Rye Crispbread (may substitute any WASA variety)

Directions

Sread 1 tablespoon of goat cheese on each crispbread. Sprinkle each crispbread with 1/2 tablespoon of capers and ½ tablespoon chopped chives. Cover each with thinly sliced salmon.
Mix olive oil and lemon juice together. Sprinkle ½ of the oil mixture on each crispbread. Sprinkle with fresh ground pepper.
Top with baby salad greens and sprinkle with remaining olive oil and lemon mixture.

TIP: Substitute cream cheese or low fat cream cheese or feta cheese for goat cheese.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serve 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 98
Total Fat 5 g
Saturated Fat 2 g
Cholesterol 10 mg
Sodium 371 mg
Total Carbohydrate 6 g
Dietary Fiber 2 g
Protein 6 g
Calcium 3% of daily value

Broccoli

Broccoli. Used to like it as a kid. Then one day I ate it and threw-up later that night. Haven’t touched it since. We’re talking 19 years of no broccoli. That’ too bad considering it’s one of the best vegetables out there – packed with nutrients, fiber, and cancer-fighting antioxidants.

As I continue to adjust my eating habits, I am always looking for new ways to add vegetables into my diet. Broccoli is one vegetable my husband loves, so I usually steam a little bit for him and make something different for myself – spinach, green beans, whatever. But the other night I was boiling some Barilla whole grain pasta. I drained the noodles and poured some organic pasta sauce over the top.

As I was scooping out the broccoli for my husband’s plate, I decided to mix some of the florets in with the pasta and red sauce. Yum. I love broccoli again. But only this way. I’m the same way with asparagus. Can’t really stand the stuff plain (unless of course it’s picked fresh from my own garden), but I will eat it in an omelet. Go figure. Š

Finding Flexibility in Inflexibility

Week 2 of my six-week stint at a newspaper is coming to a close. Four more weeks to go. It’s a blessing, as a freelancer, to have the opportunity to be a part of these projects (steady work! money! live interaction with creatures other than my dog!). But man, the corporate life wipes me out.

I get home from work about 7:30 p.m., make dinner, eat, and plop into bed by 9:00 p.m., exhausted, where I drag my laptop on my lap and spend another couple of hours swaying between vegging out and trying to keep up with my other assignments. The evening yoga class I’d planned to attend? Skipped again.

The other night during one of my zombie-like states, I was flipping through Yoga Journal magazine. The question of the month just so happened to be from a reader who wants to dedicate more time to a yoga practice but finds that work leaves little time or energy to do so.

The yogi who answered the reader question suggested three options (1) back off of a less fulfilling activity and replace it with yoga; (2) spend less time working and more time practicing (which probably means adjusting your standard of living since you’ll presumably make less money if you cut back on work); or (3) make yoga a priority in your free time.

For now I’m choosing option three — switching to a weekend yoga class instead of trying to cram a class in after work when I’m tired and hungry.

Do you have an inflexible schedule that makes practicing yoga more challenging? How do you adjust?

All in a Day’s Work

The dishes needed washing. There were two huge stacks – one by the sink and another over by the stove. One downside to cooking from scratch.

“All we had was salmon and spinach,” my husband said.

“But the teriyaki marinade* was homemade, remember?” Plus, during lunch, I’d been experimenting with homemade pasta sauce.

The dishes sat overnight. Today, evaluating the mess, I realized the entire kitchen needed attention – countertops, floors, fridge – along with the dining room, family room, and bathrooms.

I’ve never been obsessed with cleaning, but even this mess was grating on me.

On the other hand, it was 60 degrees and sunny outside. And I’ve been waiting for this weather since November.

But then again my parents were coming to visit later in the week, so I knew I really should tidy up.

I wasted 20 minutes debating, which included a phone consultation with my husband:

Him: You should definitely rollerblade – the weather is great.
Me: But I was going to wash all those dishes.
Him: Well, on second thought . . .

And an internal argument over the merits of what it means to be a person who writes about mindful living:

Me: A Zen Master of Cleaning would emphasize the importance of living an “uncluttered” life.
Me: But fresh air and exercise will balance out your day.

In the end I decided to blade. The President’s Challenge is underway and I committed to participating on this very blog . . . so you know . . . rollerblading is part of my job.

~~~

*Teriyaki Sauce from The Maker’s Diet: 1 T fresh, grated ginger; 3 cloves garlic, mashed; 1 T toasted sesame oil; 1 T rice vinegar; 1 T raw honey; ½ cup of soy sauce. Whisk together.

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