Monthly Archives: January, 2011

Lawyer for Wis. accuser: Vatican rejected lawsuit

Jan 30, 2011 2:48pm MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The attorney for a man who says he was sexually abused decades ago by a now-deceased priest at a Wisconsin school for the deaf says the Vatican has refused to be served with a lawsuit over the matter. St. Paul attorney Jeff Anderson, who frequently clashes with the […]

TTC eases up on cuts to bus routes

The Toronto Star Tess Kalinowski Transportation Reporter The TTC is expected to announce Monday it has slashed the list of 48 routes that were to have their weekend and evening hours cut due to low ridership. Seven routes have been thrown a lifeline, including the 98 Willowdale bus that serves the Rotary Cheshire Home for […]

Vatican rejects suit over Milwaukee priest’s abuse

The Daily Cardinal By Ariel Shapiro Published: Monday, January 31, 2011 Updated: Monday, January 31, 2011 02:01 Kathryn Weenig The Vatican rejected a suit alleging the Pope and two Cardinals covered up abuses by Father Lawrence Murphy. The Vatican rejected a lawsuit brought by a man who was allegedly sexually abused by a priest at […]

Fiorito: Cuts threaten bus service to Toronto’s deaf-blind community

Published On Mon Jan 31 2011 Nazar Strejko, who is deaf-blind, relies on the bus the passes by the Rotary Cheshire Home on Willowdale Ave. The route is in danger of being cut because of a lack of night riders. ANDREW WALLACE/TORONTO STAR By Joe Fiorito City Columnist Nazar Strejko held out his left hand […]

SAVE THE DATE!!

– ASL-Interpreted Shabbat Morning Services (February 12th) From Martin Luther King’s birthday (January 15th, our most-recent one) to Abraham Lincoln’s (February 12th, our next one)…that’s pretty distinguished company! New York’s Tifereth Israel-Town & Village (T&V) Synagogue (www.tandv.org) will be hosting another sign-language-interpreted Shabbat Service on Saturday morning, February 12th, and we hope you can join […]

Fairfax, VA – NVAD Lecture Series: “Death Valley & Yosemite”

NVAD Lecture Series: “Death Valley & Yosemite” Saturday, Feb 12, 2011 Dinner 5-6:30 pm Lecture 7-8:30 pm NVRC Meeting Room Homemade Soup & Sandwiches will be sold to raise funds for the 2013 VAD Conference.

Sign-Interpreted and Captioned Events at the Kennedy Center

Concerts for Young People by Young People, Classical Series with Niv Ashkenazi, Emerald Quartet, and Kristina Winiarski Millennium Stage in the Terrace Theater Sign-Interpreted & Captioned: Wednesday, February 2 at 6:00 PM Classical violinist Niv Ashkenazi, winner of the 2010 American Protege International Piano and Strings Competition, had his Carnegie Hall debut at the Weill […]

Washington, DC – Career Opportunities in the Arts

Career Opportunities in the Arts Interested in careers in the arts? The Kennedy Center’s Opening Stages Facebook Fan page is loaded with career opportunity announcements such as: Internships Fellowships Competitions Auditions Grants/Funding Scholarships Opening Stages was developed to provide students and individuals with disabilities with information and resources on career development opportunities. The Fan page […]

Texas School for the Deaf Participates in Educational Technology Classrooms

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Texas Capitol Schoolhouse Returns for 2011 Texas Legislative Session Texas School for the Deaf Participates in Educational Technology Classrooms Austin, Texas – January 28, 2011 – On Monday, January 31, 2011 from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, High School Video Technology students from the Texas School for the Deaf (TSD) show off […]

CHARITY PANCAKE BREAKFAST (Austin, Texas)

CHARITY PANCAKE BREAKFAST – Feb 5 WHAT:         Austin SERTOMA Club’s 6th Annual Pancake Breakfast Proceeds benefit the Austin SERTOMA Club’s sponsorship programs for Texas’ deaf and        hard of hearing community. WHEN:         Saturday, February 5, 2011 – 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM WHERE:         Texas School for the Deaf (TSD) cafeteria 1102 South Congress Avenue, Austin Texas […]

Poetry

It’s not often I’m in a yoga class where the teacher gives a reading during closing. But those rare times when that has been the case — well, I’ve adored it. I love words. Language. Poetry. Here’s the quote my yoga teacher read the other day:

Even after all this time
the sun never says to the earth
you owe me.
Look what happens to a love
like that – it lights the whole sky.
– Hafiz

Remembering the Golden Rule

When we lived in California my husband and I had two bamboo plants – one on our coffee table and one in our kitchen. We had an indoor ivy plant above a corner piece in the living room. And we had a peace lily in a large flowerpot by our front door.

We enjoyed our plants. They livened up our space and added a splash of color.

We even named them: Lucky, Frogger, Stan and Lily.

But we weren’t very organized about feeding them. Half the time we presumed the other person had watered them when in reality neither of us had (we’d check and then panic because their soil was extra dry). Other times we assumed the other person had forgotten to take care of the plants, so we’d both wind up watering them and then over-saturating their soil.

We had a confusing schedule with our dog too. Some days we decided to give her one scoop of food in the morning and another scoop at night. Other days we decide to give her nothing in the morning and two scoops at night. And everyday we’d have a discussion about who fed her, when we fed her, and whether she needed to be fed again. When we moved from California we gave our plants away but kept the dog. Our daily discussions over the feeding routine of our adorable mutt have continued.

We’ve often said to each other: “We need to come up with one schedule for the plants/pets and stick to it.” But no plan we thought of worked very well. Right about the time I was making the switch to Clean Eating. I read an article that suggested feeding your pets and plants before you prepare your own meals.

In other words, serve others before serving yourself.

What a great idea. After all, when I was growing up the golden rule at the dinner table was Offer the food dishes to others before taking it yourself. One summer I worked at a camp where we actually served the person to our right – I would put a piece of chicken, a spoon of broccoli, and a roll on my neighbor’s plate. Then that person would serve the person to her right, and so on…

Feeding pets and plants before meals would not only keep all the living creatures in our household on a regular schedule, it would help us transition into the intention of mindful eating. By stepping back and taking care of the needs of others first, we are reminded of how much has been given to us: our health, our bodies, and the food we are about to put inside it.

Peace & Blessings. Š

The Practice of Pause

In the most recent issue of Newsweek magazine, Robert J. Samuelson wrote a column titled The Sad Fate of the Comma.

He says:

I have always liked commas, but I seem to be in a shrinking minority. The comma is in retreat, though it is not yet extinct. In text messages and e-mails, commas appear infrequently, and then often by accident (someone hits the wrong key). Even on the printed page, commas are dwindling. Many standard uses from my childhood (after, for example, an introductory prepositional phrase) have become optional or, worse, have been ditched. If all this involved only grammar, I might let it lie. But the comma’s sad fate is, I think, a metaphor for something larger: how we deal with the frantic, can’t-wait-a-minute nature of modern life. The comma is, after all, a small sign that flashes PAUSE. It tells the reader to slow down, think a bit, and then move on. We don’t have time for that. No pauses allowed.

My husband came home from work a few hours after I read the article and mentioned that a yoga instructor had visited his office as part of their Wellness Program.

“Did you learn anything?” I asked.

He said he learned that if people took ten minutes out of their day to sit quietly and relax, scientific studies show stress levels reduce drastically. In other words, he learned it’s important to pause.

He had a worksheet from the Mind/Body Medical Institute. Click here for the full set of instructions, but in a nutshell it simply says to sit in a comfortable position, close your eyes, and breathe (the easy part), as you clear your mind of active thoughts (the hard part).

Summers seems like an especially good time to incorporate the practice of pause because schedules can get so busy. You might be thinking: “That’s precisely the problem. I’m so busy I don’t have time to relax for 10 minutes.” But as the yoga instructor who visited my husband’s office mentions on her website, pausing will calm you down and clear your mind for better decision-making, ultimately giving you much more time.     Š

Man in the Mud

Panic.

It’s a “sudden overwhelming fear, with or without cause, that produces hysterical or irrational behavior” according dictionary.com.

I’ve certainly been guilty of it. But it usually doesn’t serve me well. Like the time I convinced myself I had appendicitis and went into such hysterics that I passed out.

I came across this story last week – a construction worker in China was buried alive in the mud with nothing but a gap of air in front of his face (his helmet slid down). He didn’t panic. He practiced meditation and survived two hours on an amount of air that should have lasted five minutes.

I wonder sometimes how I would react in certain situations. What if I was eating in Windows restaurant at the top of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11? What if I was in one of the hijacked planes? I don’t think a person truly knows how he or she will respond unless in the situation. God willing, that will never be the case, but if it is, I hope I am like the man in the mud.

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