Monthly Archives: March, 2011

PRESS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Austin Sertoma Presents National Heritage Awards to Texas School for the Deaf Middle Schoolers Austin, Texas – March 31, 2010 The Austin Chapter of Service to Mankind (SERTOMA) recognized middle school students today at the Texas School for the Deaf (TSD) as part  of Sertoma’s National Heritage Freedom & Democracy […]

UberGizmo By Edwin Kee 03/31/2011, 6:36 am PT Can the condition of being deaf be reversed? A group of boffings from the University of Utah that has Richard Rabbitt at the helm has come across a method that uses lasers to offer deaf people the ability to hear. This is made possible using a…

‘Exposure’ performance sheds light on Deaf culture

Campus Times (University of Rochester) By Siobhan McLaughlin · Published on March 31, 2011 12:36 AM · Uncategorized Junior Justin Gumina, president of the ASL club, performs along with some Vocal Point members. Hannah Bazarian- Photo Editor The “Exposure” show, put on by UR’s American Sign Language performance group, Sign Language Associated Performers (S.L.A.P), accomplished […]

Court Upholds Decision Requiring Redskins To Provide Close Captioning For Deaf Fans

SB Nation by Mike Prada • Mar 30, 2011 12:08 PM EDT The Washington Redskins will be required to provide close-captioning on the scoreboard and texts of announcements made by the public-address announcer from now on after a federal appeals judge ruled in favor of three deaf fans earlier this week. The fans sued the […]

“Black Sand”

We will host ASL Film titled, “Black Sand” held at Model Secondary School for the Deaf, Washington, DC on April 8/9, 2011. Click here for flyer

Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, NY) The Rochester area has the nation’s highest per capita concentration of deaf and hard-of-hearing residents – a remarkable demographic, approached only by Washington, D.C. So we’re a natural home for a festival that features films by and about deaf people. For the fourth time, the biennial Deaf Rochester Film Festival […]

SPrint – The Celebrity Apprentice –>

Watford Observer (United Kingdom) 4:57pm Wednesday 30th March 2011 By Adam Binnie » A regular event for deaf people, held in South Oxhey, is celebrating after a successful first year. The “Deaf Pub”, a night out for people with a hearing disability, takes place every two months in the Ox Pub. The event is organised […]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIuSN3pAcgU West Palm Beach resident Peter Rozynski, a deaf softball umpire, inspires members of the deaf community – especially children – every time he calls a game. Story by ESPN 760′s Herb Uzzi on FOX 29.

Ohio Deaf Cornhole Association News Please spread the News to everyone! Need counts of how many teams will play. Partners can wear their shirts as team. Give me your names and the name of your team. See Attached: DEAF SERVICE CENTER BENEFIT YOUTH PROGRAMS CORNHOLE TOURNAMENT Admission Fans $10.00 – Includes Admission, Prizes, Soda, Chips, […]

Basic Equipment

I enjoy the beginning of yoga class because the opening is generally “easy” – well, at least physically (the meditating part can bring up its own set of challenges).

But before we practice some of the more difficult poses, we usually we open by sitting in Sukhasana for a few minutes. And then maybe move onto our hands and knees to practice Dog Tilt and Cat Pose. It’s a place for gentle movements. A time to bring awareness to our breath.

The other day at the beginning of class, we were on our hands and knees with a neutral spine (tabletop). The teacher asked us to lift our right arm off the ground and straighten it so it pointed forward. Both of our arms were engaged. The left one pushing the floor away, and the right one reaching for the wall in front of us (in a way where we weren’t scrunching our shoulder blade up to our neck). She had us hold that position. For a long, long time. It was hard. (Don’t believe me? Try it.)

“Some poses can be deceptive,” the teacher said. “Not as easy as they seem.”

I love that about yoga. I love that I don’t need an expensive gym membership or fancy equipment or special shoes to build flexibility and strength. I just need my body, my mind, and my spirit.Š

Internet Yoga

Yoga has gone high tech.

In the last few weeks I’ve come across three different websites offering “online” yoga classes.

Core Power Yoga (click “yoga on demand”)

Yoga Today (offering “outdoor” yoga classes)

&

Jiva Diva (scroll down to “live classes”)

All three sites give free classes or trial runs. I’m seriously considering trying one out because I’m about to head to Colorado for a mountain retreat for two weeks. The last time I was on retreat I found a gem of a yoga teacher who gave 90 minute private lessons out of her home for $25 (talk about a deal!). But she’s now home-schooling her kids and doesn’t have time for another student (me).

So…I’m thinking of logging on to my computer for Downward-Facing Dog time. But after debating which site to try, I actually decided that instead of Internet classes, I am going to take this time to better develop my own home practice. Tune-in next week to see if I can recall the sequence for Sun Salutations and figure out how to move into Trikonasana (Triangle Pose) without my yoga teacher prodding me to firm my thighs. I’m looking forward to rolling out my mat by my bedside and trusting myself and my practice (okay, I might bring a book of poses for a little cheat sheet, but mostly I’ll be on my own).Š

Not Quite Tuna

Tonight for dinner I made tuna salad…without tuna…or mayo.

How, you might ask, did I make such meal?

With vegetables and seasoning.

I’m trying to incorporate as many veggies into my diet as I can, so I’m always on the lookout for new recipes. One of the most interesting I’ve seen so far is “Better than Tuna” from this book. First, I whipped out my food processor. Then I discovered my food processor was broken, so I whipped out a knife and cutting board. I finely chopped three big carrots, two celery stalks, a quarter of an onion, half a red pepper, and a tomato. I drained the tomato and threw all the veggies in a bowl.

For the seasoning I mixed in one-half teaspoon Celtic sea salt, one Tablespoon parsley, one-half teaspoon kelp, and three Tablespoons of Vegenaise.

Looking at the concoction, I wasn’t sure what to think. It looked pretty appetizing, but there was only one way to find out for sure. I served the “tuna” in a toasted whole wheat hamburger bun. I also set out a platter of blue corn tortillas with hummus (I cut the tortillas into “chips” and baked them in the oven first). To drink? Fresh vegetable juice.

Numma, numma, numma. It was delicious. I highly recommend it (hopefully your food processor is working though because all that chopping was labor intensive). I’m so excited for lunch tomorrow to eat the leftovers.Š

Holidays are Changing

I’m trying to talk my parents and in-laws into coming to our place for Thanksgiving.

Ever since leaving for college at age 18, I’ve traveled over the holidays.

My hubby and I are moving in early November, and we’ll hopefully be settled into our new place by Turkey Day. I’d hate to move in and then turn around and leave right away. Plus, it sounds fun to host the holidays. Of course, I’ve never cooked a Thanksgiving dinner before, but a minor detail, right? I can figure it out.

One year I asked my mom if she’d teach me to cook the turkey. I arrived at her house ready to tackle the bird and learn how to make stuffing. My grandmother was visiting too. The two of them have been taking on Thanksgiving together forever, and despite my good intentions, everyone fell into their normal roles that year. My brother helped mash the potatoes, my dad prepared to carve, I found myself setting the table, pouring the wine, and arranging the relish tray. My mom and grandmother had their own rhythm and didn’t need anyone – including me – butting in. Or maybe I simply got distracted watching whatever movies my brother had rented from the video store. Either way, I never learned how to bake a turkey. (Actually, bake or roast?)

This year will be different. My grandmother no longer travels. One of my brothers is married and will be away. I’ve pegged the local, sustainable farm where I plan to purchase Mr. Tom. (For any vegetarians, here are some recipes I stumbled across on GentleThanksgiving.org).

My parents jumped on the chance to come to my place for a change. I hope my in-laws do too.

Times are changing. Times are changing.

Part of me is nervous about altering the rhythm of our holiday, but I’m excited too.

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