Monthly Archives: August, 2011

PLEASE NOTE:  Opportunities may be subject to the current promotional and hiring restrictions. STATE-WIDE (SEARCH EXTENDED)   August 22, 2011 JOB OPPORTUNITY #162-11 NOTE: If you are a candidate for a position that involves direct client care in one of the Department of Human Services’ hospitals or developmental centers, you may be subject to pre […]

Purple Communications Please note that fluency in America Sign Language (ASL) and extensive knowledge and experience with the deaf culture and community are critical for the ideal candidate for this role. **To apply, please send your resume through our Careers site at the following link: http://www.purple.us/jobs/search.php?jobid=214594 Purple Communications is one of the nation’s largest providers […]

Purple Communications Large Accounts Director, VRS   The right candidate must meet or exceed the requirements listed below with a very strong emphasis on marketing services and products to the deaf and hard of hearing communities. Must be fluent in ASL. *To apply for this position, please send your resume to our Purple Careers site […]

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Subtitle glasses let deaf theater customers enjoy the movies

DVICE Going to the movies can be pretty frustrating if you’re hard of hearing. At home you can turn on the closed captioning, but in a public theater you’re left trying to read lips. These subtitle glasses solve that problem, by

Book chronicles history of Kansas School for the Deaf, Olathe

The Kansas City Star LEONARD HALL GUEST COLUMNIST ORG XMIT: 971ING9L ORG XMIT: L51KTRT4 One of the most impressive historical pictorial books about Kansas School for the Deaf and Olathe is being published by the Deaf Cultural Center next month. “Kansas School for the Deaf: A Pictorial History, 1861-2011” is a…

Superintendent: Veto of Senate Bill 170 a good thing

My Journal Courier August 28, 2011 7:00 AM JAKE RUSSELL Journal-Courier An amendatory veto to a bill offering more latitude in the way of hiring new teachers and having two qualified superintendents at Illinois School for the Deaf and Illinois School for the Visually Impaired is a step in the right direction as far as […]

Y’ALL ARE INVITED TO THIS EXCITING EVENT DURING DEAF AWARENESS WEEK 2011 WITH A.S.L. HAPPY HOUR & OPEN-CAPTIONED FILM: CLAUSTROPHOBIA, starring Russell Harvard   THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER THE 15TH 5:30PM – 10:00PM HELD AT THE PALACE THEATER 2384 JAMES STREET SYRACUSE, NEW YORK $ 10.00 per ticket with CASH BAR during Happy Hour prior to the […]

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DEAF AWARENESS FAIR is cancelled (held at Great Northern Mall in Syracuse, NY) on Sunday, 9/11/2011! ALTERNATIVE EVENT:  CAROUSEL MALL GATHERING with oc movie at Carousel Cinema 17 (tba for specific movie) & food court 10am – closing Bentley Bryant Coordinator for Deaf Awareness Week 2011 (Sept 10, 12-18) CANCELLED!  >> Deaf Awareness Fair (Sept […]

Donation-Based Yoga

When I first moved to Washington DC, I was surprised to discover the average cost of a drop-in yoga class was $20. Back in California it was easy to find classes for almost half as much – maybe because there are yoga studios on practically every street corner in LA. Working off of a freelance writer’s budget, it is challenging to come up with the money for regular yoga classes. If you’re also on a tight budget, good news: yoga classes are and can be accessible to everyone. Many places offer a free class if you’re trying their yoga studio for the first time, and some instructors volunteer to give free classes on a regular basis. Bartering might be another option — attending yoga classes in exchange for working a few hours behind the desk. Finally, keep an eye out for donation-based classes. This growing movement suggests payment on a sliding scale, allowing students to pay what they can afford. To find out more about what options are available, simply ask. And most importantly, don’t forget to pay it forward by sharing with others what had been shared with you.

Top 10 Reasons I Love My Juicer

10. My produce never goes to waste anymore

9. No cooking, baking, stirring, or waiting. Just slice, juice, and drink (well, and clean)

8. Extra veggies, extra veggies, extra veggies – for both me and my spouse

7. My dog likes the scraps (dry pulp) mixed in with her meal

6. I feel clean and healthy and energized

5. The machine also makes baby food, nut butters, and pasta

4. Studies show juicing helps prevents disease

3. Juicing offers a great source of enzymes which are often destroyed by heat in cooked foods

2. It is the only way I’ll incorporate beets into my diet

1. Homemade food is the best. Hands down.

I must admit I was nervous about buying a juicer. They aren’t cheap (around $200 for a good one) and I was afraid I’d find juicing too inconvenient, resulting in a new nice appliance simply gathering dust in the corner of the kitchen. But I can’t emphasize enough how much I love it!

All in a Day’s Work

The dishes needed washing. There were two huge stacks – one by the sink and another over by the stove. One downside to cooking from scratch.

“All we had was salmon and spinach,” my husband said.

“But the teriyaki marinade* was homemade, remember?” Plus, during lunch, I’d been experimenting with homemade pasta sauce.

The dishes sat overnight. Today, evaluating the mess, I realized the entire kitchen needed attention – countertops, floors, fridge – along with the dining room, family room, and bathrooms.

I’ve never been obsessed with cleaning, but even this mess was grating on me.

On the other hand, it was 60 degrees and sunny outside. And I’ve been waiting for this weather since November.

But then again my parents were coming to visit later in the week, so I knew I really should tidy up.

I wasted 20 minutes debating, which included a phone consultation with my husband:

Him: You should definitely rollerblade – the weather is great.
Me: But I was going to wash all those dishes.
Him: Well, on second thought . . .

And an internal argument over the merits of what it means to be a person who writes about mindful living:

Me: A Zen Master of Cleaning would emphasize the importance of living an “uncluttered” life.
Me: But fresh air and exercise will balance out your day.

In the end I decided to blade. The President’s Challenge is underway and I committed to participating on this very blog . . . so you know . . . rollerblading is part of my job.

~~~

*Teriyaki Sauce from The Maker’s Diet: 1 T fresh, grated ginger; 3 cloves garlic, mashed; 1 T toasted sesame oil; 1 T rice vinegar; 1 T raw honey; ½ cup of soy sauce. Whisk together.

Retraining Taste Buds

The carrots I hold in my hand are fresh from a local garden. They’re dirty and have wild bushy green tops. I wash and peel the carrots then pick up the knife. I have a long way to go until I can maneuver this utensil like those chefs on the Food Network, but I’m getting better. Faster.

I cut the carrots, chop the onion, dice the celery, slice the mushrooms and throw everything into a skillet with water. While the veggies are steam sautéing I boil tri-colored pasta in a medium pot and steam spinach in a small one. I add tomatoes and tomato sauce to the skillet. When the pasta and spinach are ready I add those too, along with garlic and oregano.

My husband, Ron, wanders in the kitchen.

“What’s for dinner?” he asks.

“Italian Skillet Casserole,” I say.

He leans over my shoulder and investigates the simmering dish on the stovetop.

“Almost all veggies,” I point out.

Cooking healthier foods has been challenging in certain ways, but one thing I completely forgot about when I started this new path is that my husband can’t stand vegetables. He’ll eat certain items (broccoli or beans or salad) because he knows they’re good for him, but he would prefer them as a side dish, not the main dish.

But it just so happens that his company is having a Vegetable Challenge this summer.

So perfect timing.

I scoop out the meal into two bowls, light some candles, and sit down.

It’s delicious, and I look at Ron to see what he thinks. He’s pushing a piece of onion, a hunk of tomato, and a mushroom slice to the side. “I can eat them when they’re small, but these big pieces…” he shakes his head.

“You need to retrain your taste buds,” I suggest softly.

He’s a good sport so he takes a huge spoonful, onion chunks and all, and gives it a go. He likes it. This truly is one of the tastier dishes I’ve made, and when I’m done I push my bowl aside and lean back in the chair.

“Hey, what’s that?” Ron says, peering into my bowl.

“Nothing,” I say.

“Uh-huh,” Ron nods, smirking.

Okay, okay. So I really do consider myself a vegetable lover, but I’ve always struggled with cooked carrots. There is small pile of them left. I guess we both have some retraining to work through.

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