Monthly Archives: May, 2012

Friday, June 8, 2012 8:00pm til Closing We are moving our June Friday night out to the 2nd Friday of the month before the Deaf Festival Day. This place has a beach in its backyard and Lake Ontario!! I hosted this event back in August of 2011 and it was a HUGE success!!  What better […]

Fulton Sun Yet we govern our own international, national, state and local organizations. They include the World Federation of the Deaf, National Association of the Deaf, Deaf Olympics, States Associations of the Deaf and local Deaf Clubs, including Sport agendas … See More…

Huffington Post In the first place, the National Association of the Deaf (NAD) has existed since 1880, filling a dire need to ensure deaf people were afforded the same equal rights as hearing people. Indeed, the oppression of deaf people is a shameful chapter in … See more…

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE     SENIORS TAKE CENTER STAGE TEXAS SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF’S CLASS OF 2012 – SCHOLARSHIPS and AWARDS CEREMONY Austin, Texas – May 30, 2012  Today at the Texas School for the Deaf (TSD), the Graduating Class of 2012 strolls down the South Austin campus, with teachers and staff members waving final […]

4th Annual Rochester School for the Deaf   River Ramble 5K Run / 2 Mile Walk / 1 Mile Family Fun Walk   Saturday, June 2, 2012   Rain or Shine!   On-site Registration / Check-In Begins: 8:00 a.m.   Run Begins: 9:00 a.m. / Walk Begins 9:05 a.m.   1545 St. Paul Street Rochester, […]

KMGH Denver A Colorado mother and the Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition have filed a lawsuit against Arapahoe County over what they claim is a lack of sign language interpreters. Teresa Fekany is deaf and uses American Sign Language to communicate. To see more..

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New York Daily News IGNOU Vice Chancellor M. Aslam said that at present, there were 90 deaf students in IGNOU and they were considered a linguistic minority rather than a disability group. “The moment we pick up how they talk to each other, they start communicating with … To see more…

RIT News As the academic year comes to an end, several RIT/NTID students received honors and scholarships for their achievements and continued efforts to succeed. To see more…

What: OCC ITP Sign Club – Game Night When: June 23, 2012 Where: Ocean County College – College Drive, Toms River NJ Time: 7pm – 10pm Please come bring your favorite board game, and come socialize at our June Sign Club. We are bringing back summer sign clubs, with lots of events this summer. Please join […]

Halloween

I’m debating what to do about Halloween.

I loved dressing up and collecting candy as a kid. But as an adult – and someone with a growing awareness of our country’s health crisis – I don’t want to encourage the consumption of sugar, high fructose corn syrup, artificial flavorings…you get the idea.

I could hand out boxes of raisins, but I hated that as a child.

I could hand out toothbrushes, but again, that’s no fun.

I could bake something – treats using crispy brown rice cereal and natural peanut butter – but I know homemade goods would get thrown out by vigilant parents.

I have a friend who has her kids put their loot in a pile before bed. During the night the Great Pumpkin comes and Poof! their candy is turned into little games and trinkets from the dollar store. I also know a dentist who gives money in exchange for the kids who turn in their candy.

Hmm.

I was reading a recent issue of Body & Soul magazine and saw a small article on fair trade. Most chocolate, the article said, is exported from the Ivory Coast where kids aren’t going to school because they’re working on cocoa farms to help with family income. Buying fair trade products ensures that the money goes directly to the farmers and their communities instead of all the middlemen. And it just so happens that you can buy individually wrapped pieces of fair trade dark chocolate (according to some studies, dark chocolate does have a few health benefits).

Click here for a link to the article and a list of the companies.

A Time to Feast

I’m hanging out with my parents when my dad sees me frantically rubbing my thumbs against the palms of my hands.

“Are you nervous?” he asks.

“Yeah,” I say.

He wants to know why. How to explain?

My parents have been visiting the past few days. I haven’t seen them in over six months. It’s the longest period of time we’ve ever been apart (even when I lived in Europe after college I saw them at least every four months). The past few days have been one big party. We’ve eaten red meat and fried foods. We’ve had Grasshoppers (ice cream and alcohol) and cookies. I think I munched on a vegetable in there somewhere – yes, I steamed spinach one night – but other than that, I can’t say I’ve been practicing “mindful eating” since Saturday. And my home yoga regime? Completely cut off once my parents arrived (although my mom saw my mat, which was rolled out on the floor, and she practiced sun salutations).

“I’m not sure what to blog about for Wasa this week,” I finally say to my dad.

“Well, let’s think,” he says.

“I’m supposed to blog about yoga and mindful eating, but I’m not inspired given my eating habits and lack of yoga practice,” I explain.

My dad is silent for awhile. “You could talk about how yoga is important for old people like me,” he finally says. “As people age, they are at an increased risk of falling. So write in your blog that yoga is important for balance and to do yoga with a Wasa cracker.”

“Uh, okay. Thanks,” I say.

“Just trying to help,” he says.

My mom chimes in too. “Oh, I know,” she says. “Blog about the fact that we bought a juicer.”

It’s true. My parents read the Wasa blog and were inspired to buy a juicer.

“Last week we made peach juice with vodka,” my mom says. “It was delicious!” She pauses. “Am I missing the point?”

Well, I do wish they would make vegetable juice instead, but maybe I’m the one who is missing the point. As I drop them off at the airport, I know what I’m going to blog about: A Time to Feast. This week we’ve hit up good restaurants and had fun cooking in too. We played cards and watched baseball and talked, all over scones for breakfast and steaks for dinner. It was a reunion. A celebration.  A time to enjoy life. Not that we couldn’t have done that over Brussels sprouts and brown rice, but eating well most of the time makes it easier to allow the exceptions. Not to mention, those “exceptions” are much appreciated.

Basic Equipment

I enjoy the beginning of yoga class because the opening is generally “easy” – well, at least physically (the meditating part can bring up its own set of challenges).

But before we practice some of the more difficult poses, we usually we open by sitting in Sukhasana for a few minutes. And then maybe move onto our hands and knees to practice Dog Tilt and Cat Pose. It’s a place for gentle movements. A time to bring awareness to our breath.

The other day at the beginning of class, we were on our hands and knees with a neutral spine (tabletop). The teacher asked us to lift our right arm off the ground and straighten it so it pointed forward. Both of our arms were engaged. The left one pushing the floor away, and the right one reaching for the wall in front of us (in a way where we weren’t scrunching our shoulder blade up to our neck). She had us hold that position. For a long, long time. It was hard. (Don’t believe me? Try it.)

“Some poses can be deceptive,” the teacher said. “Not as easy as they seem.”

I love that about yoga. I love that I don’t need an expensive gym membership or fancy equipment or special shoes to build flexibility and strength. I just need my body, my mind, and my spirit.Š

Sunday Crowds

I don’t know what I was thinking. Hmm. I guess I was thinking that I had a few free hours, so why not sketch out a menu for the week and stock up with ingredients at the grocery store? Off I went – the Sunday afternoon of Labor Day weekend – and as soon as I walked in the door I realized my mistake.

What a zoo.

I tried to practice my yoga breaths as carts jammed the aisles and children blocked my path as they played handheld video games in front of the eggs while their parents taste-tested the artichoke dip. I tried to remember I had just come from church and I should be patient and kind and gentle and not cave into my mounting frustration. Breathe. Breathe. BREATHE!

Egad.

I do not do well in crowds.

The trick to grocery shopping (at least the one I go to in my town) is to hit the store early Monday morning. It’s empty and open and I can take my time reviewing my list and making sure I have everything I need for the week. When I had an office job with less flexible hours, I’d go to the store late at night. I’d have to step around boxes of fresh shipments, but it was better than being piled in an enclosed space with too many people. My goal is to get away from stores almost entirely – next season I’m signing up for a CSA subscription. And I’m continuing to explore year-round farmers’ markets (for some reason crowds don’t bother me as much when I’m outside) and buying local food through other direct methods. But I’m in transition, so for awhile I’ll be heading to the store at least once a week. On Monday mornings. Š

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