Monthly Archives: February, 2013

$5.75 Million Settlement Awarded to Deaf and Blind Students Sexually …

Hawaii Reporter BY MALIA ZIMMERMAN – A young girl is forced to perform oral sex on an older boy while he films her with his cell phone camera and students at their school look on; another young girl becomes pregnant after she is raped by a male student at her school; … To see…

Hi, everyone~~~~ PLEASE COME TO 2013 PIG ROAST FOR SYRACUSE DEAF CLUB GOOD TIMES ON SATURDAY, AUGUST 3RD FROM 11:00AM – “5:00PM” AT JAMESVILLE SPORTSMEN’S CLUB.  AFTER 5PM, YOU CAN STAY FOR POKER, LCR, BOCCE, ..… WITH US FRIENDS! MARK THE DATE FOR A REMINDER! MORE INFO WILL BE COMING SOON. SDC MEETING IS ON […]

A MEMORIAL SERVICE:  REMEMBERING LIVES TAKEN CDR, RCIL AND AAY are joining with disability advocates in cities across the country to remember and honor people with disabilities who have been killed by a parent, spouse or other family member. FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 2013 11:00 A.M. – 12:00 NOON AT CDR, 497 STATE STREET, ROCHESTER, NY […]

Click here to see Captioned Survey

March 7 Deaf history RRCD flyer

BRINGING THE STAGE TO LIFE TOUR FLYER – HIRAM WEB FLYER

Sprint Relay Store at DeafNation Tampa   Sprint Relay Data Only Plan This offer is not valid at Sprint stores or websites other than www.sprintrelaystore.com. All purchases must be made through the Sprint Relay Store or any authorized Sprint Relay Representative. The Sprint Relay Store sells iconic and award winning devices and relay services providing […]

New Jersey Association of the Deaf, Inc. Click here to see flyer Wine Tasting Fundraiser Saturday, April 13, 2013  -  3pm to 5pm Cream Ridge Winery, 145 Country Road 539, Cream Ridge NJ 08501 $25 pp | by April 5, 2013 No Walk-In at Door In addition to delicious wines and cheeses, one free ticket […]

Arugula Avocado, Mozzarella and Tomatoes on Wasa

Ingredients

1 tablespoon avocado, chopped
1 tablespoon fresh mozzarella, chopped
1 tablespoon plum tomatoes, chopped
½ tablespoon chives, chopped into ½ inch long pieces
½ teaspoon olive oil
Salt to taste
Freshly ground pepper to taste
½ cup arugula, chopped
2 pieces WASA Sourdough Crispbread (may substitute WASA Hearty Rye, Sourdough Rye or Multigrain Crispbread)

Directions

Mix together avocado, mozzarella and tomatoes in a small bowl.
Add chives, olive oil, salt and pepper. Mix well.
Place chopped arugula on WASA Crispbread and top with salsa mixture.

TIP: Substitute mixed baby greens or baby spinach for arugula

Prep time: 10 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 80
Total Fat 4 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Cholesterol 6 mg
Sodium 100 mg
Total Carbohydrate 9 g
Dietary Fiber 2 g
Protein 3 g
Calcium 8% of daily value

Not Quite Tuna

Tonight for dinner I made tuna salad…without tuna…or mayo.

How, you might ask, did I make such meal?

With vegetables and seasoning.

I’m trying to incorporate as many veggies into my diet as I can, so I’m always on the lookout for new recipes. One of the most interesting I’ve seen so far is “Better than Tuna” from this book. First, I whipped out my food processor. Then I discovered my food processor was broken, so I whipped out a knife and cutting board. I finely chopped three big carrots, two celery stalks, a quarter of an onion, half a red pepper, and a tomato. I drained the tomato and threw all the veggies in a bowl.

For the seasoning I mixed in one-half teaspoon Celtic sea salt, one Tablespoon parsley, one-half teaspoon kelp, and three Tablespoons of Vegenaise.

Looking at the concoction, I wasn’t sure what to think. It looked pretty appetizing, but there was only one way to find out for sure. I served the “tuna” in a toasted whole wheat hamburger bun. I also set out a platter of blue corn tortillas with hummus (I cut the tortillas into “chips” and baked them in the oven first). To drink? Fresh vegetable juice.

Numma, numma, numma. It was delicious. I highly recommend it (hopefully your food processor is working though because all that chopping was labor intensive). I’m so excited for lunch tomorrow to eat the leftovers.Š

Secret Ingredient

Does anyone know the secret ingredient that goes into making the perfect Smoothie? I can’t figure it out. My blender and I have been bonding lately as I try out different recipes. In addition to ice and some frozen strawberries and blueberries, I try:

Smoothies with frozen banana.

Smoothies with frozen banana and whey protein powder.

Smoothies without either.

Smoothies with honey. Smoothies with Stevia. Smoothies with an egg. Smoothies with soy milk.

No matter what I do, they simply don’t taste as good as the kind I buy. It’s not that they taste bad, but after a few sips I kinda forget about them. When I find the abandoned half-empty glass later on, I feel like I’ve wasted food. One does not forget about a really good Smoothie.

At first I thought maybe it was because when I buy Smoothies they’re probably full of sugar and ice cream or something. But no, I thoroughly enjoyed the Smoothies I drank every afternoon at a yoga retreat in Mexico last February – everything that kitchen prepared was of the healthy, no-sugar variety. I fondly recall sitting under a shade tree at the beach in the afternoons (after a morning of working out) and looking forward to seeing the resort’s chef saunter over with his latest concoction. Wait a sec…the secret ingredient I’m missing? I think it might be the beach. That is, after all, the only place I really ever drink Smoothies. There’s something about the white sand and the turquoise waters and reading a good book that makes a Smoothie taste so perfectly good.

I live far, far away from the beach.

Well, shoot.Š

A Time to Feast

I’m hanging out with my parents when my dad sees me frantically rubbing my thumbs against the palms of my hands.

“Are you nervous?” he asks.

“Yeah,” I say.

He wants to know why. How to explain?

My parents have been visiting the past few days. I haven’t seen them in over six months. It’s the longest period of time we’ve ever been apart (even when I lived in Europe after college I saw them at least every four months). The past few days have been one big party. We’ve eaten red meat and fried foods. We’ve had Grasshoppers (ice cream and alcohol) and cookies. I think I munched on a vegetable in there somewhere – yes, I steamed spinach one night – but other than that, I can’t say I’ve been practicing “mindful eating” since Saturday. And my home yoga regime? Completely cut off once my parents arrived (although my mom saw my mat, which was rolled out on the floor, and she practiced sun salutations).

“I’m not sure what to blog about for Wasa this week,” I finally say to my dad.

“Well, let’s think,” he says.

“I’m supposed to blog about yoga and mindful eating, but I’m not inspired given my eating habits and lack of yoga practice,” I explain.

My dad is silent for awhile. “You could talk about how yoga is important for old people like me,” he finally says. “As people age, they are at an increased risk of falling. So write in your blog that yoga is important for balance and to do yoga with a Wasa cracker.”

“Uh, okay. Thanks,” I say.

“Just trying to help,” he says.

My mom chimes in too. “Oh, I know,” she says. “Blog about the fact that we bought a juicer.”

It’s true. My parents read the Wasa blog and were inspired to buy a juicer.

“Last week we made peach juice with vodka,” my mom says. “It was delicious!” She pauses. “Am I missing the point?”

Well, I do wish they would make vegetable juice instead, but maybe I’m the one who is missing the point. As I drop them off at the airport, I know what I’m going to blog about: A Time to Feast. This week we’ve hit up good restaurants and had fun cooking in too. We played cards and watched baseball and talked, all over scones for breakfast and steaks for dinner. It was a reunion. A celebration.  A time to enjoy life. Not that we couldn’t have done that over Brussels sprouts and brown rice, but eating well most of the time makes it easier to allow the exceptions. Not to mention, those “exceptions” are much appreciated.

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