Monthly Archives: September, 2013

Northwest Jersey Association of the Deaf would let you know that ASL Storytelling Event on Oct 5th is cancelled due to insufficient attendees. We will host it sometime in the spring. We will keep you posted. If you already paid to attend, the money will return to you.

October 10, 2013 Thursday 2 – 3:15 in LBJ 2590 De’VIA artists – Nancy Rourke & Ellen Mansfield: From Deafhood to Artivism October 11 – 12, 2013 Friday and Saturday Deaf View / Image Artists (De’VIA) Marketplace Dyer Arts Center, LBJ Meet and buy art from Janna Dahl, Hinda Kasher, Ellen Mansfield, Nancy Rourke, Jackie […]

The NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, Sportsman Education Program announces a Hunter Education class that we are offering that will have an ASL interpreter present. Hunter Education is required for anyone who want to hunt for the first time.   These classes are available to anyone 11 yrs old and older (one must be 12 to hunt in […]

Ocean Deaf Club 2013 HOLIDAY FLYER-1

Helping Hands    is a support group dedicated to supporting families and their children who are deaf or hard of hearing. This support group welcomes all modes of communication and methods, including auditory-verbal, auditory-oral, cued speech, sign language, speech reading and total communication.  This group will allow families to come together to help each of us to […]

Our event is on Oct 25, Friday with Msgr Nelson and October 26th, Saturday With Nsgr Nelson and then Oct 27th – Msgr Nelson will celebrate mass with us.     Please see attachments. nelsonworkshopoct2 pizzapartynelson   Thank you, have a great Wednesday!     Kate Slosar Co-Director, Ministry with the Deaf Diocese of Camden […]

Golf 101 Stephen Rute Comedy Golfer The Deaf Golf Comedy Performance is coming to town! Come and Enjoy The show with old friends AND NEW for a Good laugh. . . This performance is designed to help students learn sign language associated with golf and humor, and it will benefit the deaf community as well […]

ASL Storytelling Event

See Attachment… COLUMBUS ASSOCIATION OF THE DEAF CHRISTMAS DINGO SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21ST, 2013 DOOR OPEN AT 4:00 P.M. GAME STARTS AT 7:00 P.M. RAMADA PLAZA HOTEL 4900 SINCLAIR RD COLUMBUS, OHIO 43229 ADMISSION: MEMBERS   –     $7.00 NON-MEMBERS – $12.00 DOOR PRIZES PRIZES GIVEN AWAY (NO PROFIT) T.V. 50/50 RAFFLE GIVE AWAY “NO […]

Sorry it took to long in getting this information out.  We had some challenges and obstacles or overcome, but the way has been cleared for the ASL Music workshop for those of you who would like help with religious signing.  Steve Dye, who is deaf will be teaching this workshop and you will not want […]

Retraining Taste Buds

The carrots I hold in my hand are fresh from a local garden. They’re dirty and have wild bushy green tops. I wash and peel the carrots then pick up the knife. I have a long way to go until I can maneuver this utensil like those chefs on the Food Network, but I’m getting better. Faster.

I cut the carrots, chop the onion, dice the celery, slice the mushrooms and throw everything into a skillet with water. While the veggies are steam sautéing I boil tri-colored pasta in a medium pot and steam spinach in a small one. I add tomatoes and tomato sauce to the skillet. When the pasta and spinach are ready I add those too, along with garlic and oregano.

My husband, Ron, wanders in the kitchen.

“What’s for dinner?” he asks.

“Italian Skillet Casserole,” I say.

He leans over my shoulder and investigates the simmering dish on the stovetop.

“Almost all veggies,” I point out.

Cooking healthier foods has been challenging in certain ways, but one thing I completely forgot about when I started this new path is that my husband can’t stand vegetables. He’ll eat certain items (broccoli or beans or salad) because he knows they’re good for him, but he would prefer them as a side dish, not the main dish.

But it just so happens that his company is having a Vegetable Challenge this summer.

So perfect timing.

I scoop out the meal into two bowls, light some candles, and sit down.

It’s delicious, and I look at Ron to see what he thinks. He’s pushing a piece of onion, a hunk of tomato, and a mushroom slice to the side. “I can eat them when they’re small, but these big pieces…” he shakes his head.

“You need to retrain your taste buds,” I suggest softly.

He’s a good sport so he takes a huge spoonful, onion chunks and all, and gives it a go. He likes it. This truly is one of the tastier dishes I’ve made, and when I’m done I push my bowl aside and lean back in the chair.

“Hey, what’s that?” Ron says, peering into my bowl.

“Nothing,” I say.

“Uh-huh,” Ron nods, smirking.

Okay, okay. So I really do consider myself a vegetable lover, but I’ve always struggled with cooked carrots. There is small pile of them left. I guess we both have some retraining to work through.

Herbs

One of my husbands charms is that if it’s my birthday, or a holiday, or some other gift-giving event, he’ll sneak in a surprise present – a little something extra that wasn’t on my list that he thought of completely on his own. For example, one year he gave me a handheld Ms. Pac-Man game because he knew I used to love Ms. Pac-Man s a kid (one time we came across the video machine in a restaurant, and I went nuts, challenging my husband to round after round until I had blisters).

So this year – after reading and observing me write the Wasa blog, and noticing my developing interest in cooking – he gave me an herb garden. Well, sort of. We don’t have real garden space in our city place, so he gave me a kit that you can assemble right on your countertop.

Mint.
Basil.
Dill.
Cilantro.
Thyme.
Parsley.
Chives.

My mom and I put together this afternoon.

We snapped a light onto the “garden” and popped in the seed pods.

“Can it really be this easy?” I said.

It was.

We added some water, feed it some nutrients, and left it to grow.

It takes about five weeks until the herbs will be ready for harvesting.

First recipe? I’m thinking a garden herb omelet.

Broccoli

Broccoli. Used to like it as a kid. Then one day I ate it and threw-up later that night. Haven’t touched it since. We’re talking 19 years of no broccoli. That’ too bad considering it’s one of the best vegetables out there – packed with nutrients, fiber, and cancer-fighting antioxidants.

As I continue to adjust my eating habits, I am always looking for new ways to add vegetables into my diet. Broccoli is one vegetable my husband loves, so I usually steam a little bit for him and make something different for myself – spinach, green beans, whatever. But the other night I was boiling some Barilla whole grain pasta. I drained the noodles and poured some organic pasta sauce over the top.

As I was scooping out the broccoli for my husband’s plate, I decided to mix some of the florets in with the pasta and red sauce. Yum. I love broccoli again. But only this way. I’m the same way with asparagus. Can’t really stand the stuff plain (unless of course it’s picked fresh from my own garden), but I will eat it in an omelet. Go figure. Š

Man in the Mud

Panic.

It’s a “sudden overwhelming fear, with or without cause, that produces hysterical or irrational behavior” according dictionary.com.

I’ve certainly been guilty of it. But it usually doesn’t serve me well. Like the time I convinced myself I had appendicitis and went into such hysterics that I passed out.

I came across this story last week – a construction worker in China was buried alive in the mud with nothing but a gap of air in front of his face (his helmet slid down). He didn’t panic. He practiced meditation and survived two hours on an amount of air that should have lasted five minutes.

I wonder sometimes how I would react in certain situations. What if I was eating in Windows restaurant at the top of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11? What if I was in one of the hijacked planes? I don’t think a person truly knows how he or she will respond unless in the situation. God willing, that will never be the case, but if it is, I hope I am like the man in the mud.

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