Author Archives: Ray

October flyer

We’re thrilled to announce more sign-language-interpreted Shabbat Morning Services, and we hope that you can join us! ********** WHAT: A Service with full readings from the Torah and Haftorah (Prophets) WHEN: 10:00 AM — 12:30 PM on Saturdays, October 19th & November 9th WHERE: Town & Village (T&V) Synagogue (www.tandv.org), 334 East 14th Street, between […]

—————————————————————————————- http://www.RSDeaf.org/Adventures   Rochester School for the Deaf presents 21st ANNUAL ADVENTURES IN EDUCATION   TODD HUSTON: “MORE THAN MOUNTAINS“ October 16-17, 2013   Get ready to be truly inspired by Todd Huston – a uniquely brave and humble individual, who has overcome incredible challenges to achieve his goals and make his dreams come true. […]

– RRCD1564 Lyell Ave Rochester, NY 14606 Email: Please check our calendar. www.RochesterDeafClub.com

Ocean Deaf Club, Inc.  Saturday, October 19th   Lingo Game *   The Presbyterian Church  101 Orchard Street, Lakehurst, NJ (Union Avenue & Pine Street)    Doors Open at 6:30pm The game will start around 7:30 pm Members: $10.00 Non-Members: $12.00 * Wear Black & Orange for a special Halloween Prize If you bring homemade or store bought dessert, […]

Volunteer Opportunity: Rochester School for the Deaf is hosting this year’s Gallaudet University Northeastern Region Academic Bowl, December 5-7. Eighteen high school teams of deaf/hard-of-hearing students from across the Northeast will converge on the RSD campus for this momentous event. There is a need for as many as 50 volunteers! and we are now recruiting and […]

Northwest Jersey Association of the Deaf would let you know that ASL Storytelling Event on Oct 5th is cancelled due to insufficient attendees. We will host it sometime in the spring. We will keep you posted. If you already paid to attend, the money will return to you.

October 10, 2013 Thursday 2 – 3:15 in LBJ 2590 De’VIA artists – Nancy Rourke & Ellen Mansfield: From Deafhood to Artivism October 11 – 12, 2013 Friday and Saturday Deaf View / Image Artists (De’VIA) Marketplace Dyer Arts Center, LBJ Meet and buy art from Janna Dahl, Hinda Kasher, Ellen Mansfield, Nancy Rourke, Jackie […]

The NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, Sportsman Education Program announces a Hunter Education class that we are offering that will have an ASL interpreter present. Hunter Education is required for anyone who want to hunt for the first time.   These classes are available to anyone 11 yrs old and older (one must be 12 to hunt in […]

Ocean Deaf Club 2013 HOLIDAY FLYER-1

My Kind of Yogi

My car crunches over the gravel as I pull into the parking lot of the yoga studio. Climbing up the rickety stairs of the wood building, I’m filled with hope.

This is the ninth yoga instructor I’ve tried since moving to DC. For whatever reason, I can’t seem to find a teacher that feels like the right fit. In part, I’m grieving the loss of my instructor from Los Angeles whom I adored. And I admit I don’t mind the teachers I’ve practiced with here, but I find yoga easier to maintain when I feel a strong authentic connection.

A few months ago I tried a class where the teacher did seem like a great fit. But when I returned, she was no longer there. I scoured the web searching for her to pop up in another studio around town. I only had a first name to go off of, but I think I might have found her and that’s why I’m here today.

I sign in at the desk and walk into the studio. The teacher is asking the class to get two blocks, a blanket, and a strap. Yep, that’s her. I can tell by the sound of her voice.

She walks by me on her way to close the door of the studio, but she pauses before reaching her destination. She watches me as I pull back my hair back into a loose ponytail.

“Hi. I’m Jenny. I’m a drop-in,” I say.

“I know you,” she says.

I sigh in relief. She remembers me.

“I took a restorative yoga class you taught in another studio a few months ago. I’ve been looking for you ever since. You’re hard to find,” I explain.

“Yes,” she nods, remembering the class. “It’s taken me awhile to get going and figure out where to set up shop.”

Well no wonder I couldn’t find her. She’s a new teacher. Later, I discover that she had a health scare which caused her to re-evaluate her entire career as a molecular biologist. Once she recovered, she decided to become a yoga teacher. Love that (I had a similar experience three years ago and that’s when I began writing).

We open by chanting three Oms. Then she tells us to be sure not to miss class three weeks from now. She’ll be teaching it outside where we will all face the trees so we can experience a “yoga foliage festival.” Oh yeah, she’s my kind of yogi. Š

Retraining Taste Buds

The carrots I hold in my hand are fresh from a local garden. They’re dirty and have wild bushy green tops. I wash and peel the carrots then pick up the knife. I have a long way to go until I can maneuver this utensil like those chefs on the Food Network, but I’m getting better. Faster.

I cut the carrots, chop the onion, dice the celery, slice the mushrooms and throw everything into a skillet with water. While the veggies are steam sautéing I boil tri-colored pasta in a medium pot and steam spinach in a small one. I add tomatoes and tomato sauce to the skillet. When the pasta and spinach are ready I add those too, along with garlic and oregano.

My husband, Ron, wanders in the kitchen.

“What’s for dinner?” he asks.

“Italian Skillet Casserole,” I say.

He leans over my shoulder and investigates the simmering dish on the stovetop.

“Almost all veggies,” I point out.

Cooking healthier foods has been challenging in certain ways, but one thing I completely forgot about when I started this new path is that my husband can’t stand vegetables. He’ll eat certain items (broccoli or beans or salad) because he knows they’re good for him, but he would prefer them as a side dish, not the main dish.

But it just so happens that his company is having a Vegetable Challenge this summer.

So perfect timing.

I scoop out the meal into two bowls, light some candles, and sit down.

It’s delicious, and I look at Ron to see what he thinks. He’s pushing a piece of onion, a hunk of tomato, and a mushroom slice to the side. “I can eat them when they’re small, but these big pieces…” he shakes his head.

“You need to retrain your taste buds,” I suggest softly.

He’s a good sport so he takes a huge spoonful, onion chunks and all, and gives it a go. He likes it. This truly is one of the tastier dishes I’ve made, and when I’m done I push my bowl aside and lean back in the chair.

“Hey, what’s that?” Ron says, peering into my bowl.

“Nothing,” I say.

“Uh-huh,” Ron nods, smirking.

Okay, okay. So I really do consider myself a vegetable lover, but I’ve always struggled with cooked carrots. There is small pile of them left. I guess we both have some retraining to work through.

Turkey and Avocado Wasa Sandwich

Ingredients

3 slices Havarti cheese, sliced thin
½ avocado, sliced thin
3 slices turkey breast
1 teaspoon olive oil
¼ cup tomatoes, finely minced
2 tablespoons purple onion, finely minced
1 tablespoon Italian flat leaf parsley, chopped
Salt to taste
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
3 pieces WASA Hearty Rye Crispbread (may substitute any WASA Crispbread flavor)

Directions

Combine olive oil, tomatoes, purple onion, parsley, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Mix and set aside.
Place 1 slice of Havarti cheese, 1 slice of turkey breast, 3 thin slices of avocado on each crispbread. Top with tomato and onion mixture.

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 180
Total Fat 9 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Cholesterol 34 mg
Sodium 150 mg
Total Carbohydrate 11 g
Dietary Fiber 3 g
Protein 13 g
Calcium 10% of daily value

Toes

Lately, I’ve been giving them a lot of thought.

First, my yoga teacher is always including toes in her instructions. Lift them off the ground (one at a time). Spread them. Plant them back on your mat (one at a time). It takes awhile to learn to control them – they’re so often ignored. Second, I was reading a book about a woman who had a stroke and was paralyzed on her left side, including all her toes. She was explaining the rehabilitation process and talking about the fact that she realized – once she could no longer use them – how important toes are for balance and for pushing off of when walking. Third, I just so happened to be reading the book passage while I was getting a pedicure (a gift from my husband).

So toes were on my mind.

For most of my life I didn’t pay attention to them. And when I got older I would shove them into cold, hard pointy shoes. In turn, that led to foot cramps. The cramps would attack in the middle of the night and hurt so bad I’d cry. But when I started practicing yoga, I noticed my foot cramps disappeared. I decided to give my feet the love they deserved. In addition to yoga, I began wearing comfortable shoes. And from time to time, I’d get a pedicure. I stopped painting my nails awhile ago (to avoid the harsh chemicals), but today I made a special exception.

I picked a color – Dutch Tulips – in honor of spring.

When they were red and shiny, I wiggled them and smiled. Thankful for my toes.

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