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Employment Specialist for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing *American Sign Language Required* Bridges to Employment, a division of Alternatives, Inc., is a comprehensive career service. Our team offers an array of employment related solutions to meet a variety of today’s workforce needs. We are currently expanding our services and seeking Employment Specialists to work […]

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Mental Health Clinician (Mental Health Specialist) – Duluth, Minnesota Deaf & Hard of Hearing Services Division Minnesota Department of Human Services   $22.62 – $ 33.34 hourly ($ 47,231 – $ 69,614 annually)   Contact:   Description of Work:   This position provides culturally affirmative mental health services to deaf and hard of hearing […]

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DIETARY AIDES Part-Time/Full-time   Columbus Colony Elderly Care is a unique 150 bed Nursing and Rehab Facility which provides loving care to deaf, deaf/blind and hearing residents. Responsibilities include serving line prep, service, and clean-up for meals served. Experience in food service and ASL skills preferred . American Sign  Language classes are provided at no […]

  OPEN POSITION   Position:  Accounts Payable Clerk – Full time   Responsibilities: Review, verify, code and enter invoices Research and resolve discrepancies                                      Provide supporting documentation for audits Reconcile monthly statements and transactions Prepare and perform check run File all related paperwork Data entry for Accounts Receivable Other duties as needed Qualifications:  Accounts payable experience […]

DIETARY AIDES Part-Time/Full-time   Columbus Colony Elderly Care is a unique 150 bed Nursing and Rehab Facility which provides loving care to deaf, deaf/blind and hearing residents. Responsibilities include serving line prep, service, and clean-up for meals served. Experience in food service and ASL skills preferred . American Sign  Language classes are provided at no […]

Yosemite National Park Publishes Five General Info Videos in ASL Yosemite has had a full-time sign language interpreter in the park every summer for 34 years, but you can get information in sign language before you come to the park too.  Yosemite Deaf Services just published five videos in ASL.  Each video addresses a commonly […]

Job Opportunity ASL Instructor (Rochester, NY)

Click here ASL Instructor 2013

All in a Day’s Work

The dishes needed washing. There were two huge stacks – one by the sink and another over by the stove. One downside to cooking from scratch.

“All we had was salmon and spinach,” my husband said.

“But the teriyaki marinade* was homemade, remember?” Plus, during lunch, I’d been experimenting with homemade pasta sauce.

The dishes sat overnight. Today, evaluating the mess, I realized the entire kitchen needed attention – countertops, floors, fridge – along with the dining room, family room, and bathrooms.

I’ve never been obsessed with cleaning, but even this mess was grating on me.

On the other hand, it was 60 degrees and sunny outside. And I’ve been waiting for this weather since November.

But then again my parents were coming to visit later in the week, so I knew I really should tidy up.

I wasted 20 minutes debating, which included a phone consultation with my husband:

Him: You should definitely rollerblade – the weather is great.
Me: But I was going to wash all those dishes.
Him: Well, on second thought . . .

And an internal argument over the merits of what it means to be a person who writes about mindful living:

Me: A Zen Master of Cleaning would emphasize the importance of living an “uncluttered” life.
Me: But fresh air and exercise will balance out your day.

In the end I decided to blade. The President’s Challenge is underway and I committed to participating on this very blog . . . so you know . . . rollerblading is part of my job.

~~~

*Teriyaki Sauce from The Maker’s Diet: 1 T fresh, grated ginger; 3 cloves garlic, mashed; 1 T toasted sesame oil; 1 T rice vinegar; 1 T raw honey; ½ cup of soy sauce. Whisk together.

The Practice of Pause

In the most recent issue of Newsweek magazine, Robert J. Samuelson wrote a column titled The Sad Fate of the Comma.

He says:

I have always liked commas, but I seem to be in a shrinking minority. The comma is in retreat, though it is not yet extinct. In text messages and e-mails, commas appear infrequently, and then often by accident (someone hits the wrong key). Even on the printed page, commas are dwindling. Many standard uses from my childhood (after, for example, an introductory prepositional phrase) have become optional or, worse, have been ditched. If all this involved only grammar, I might let it lie. But the comma’s sad fate is, I think, a metaphor for something larger: how we deal with the frantic, can’t-wait-a-minute nature of modern life. The comma is, after all, a small sign that flashes PAUSE. It tells the reader to slow down, think a bit, and then move on. We don’t have time for that. No pauses allowed.

My husband came home from work a few hours after I read the article and mentioned that a yoga instructor had visited his office as part of their Wellness Program.

“Did you learn anything?” I asked.

He said he learned that if people took ten minutes out of their day to sit quietly and relax, scientific studies show stress levels reduce drastically. In other words, he learned it’s important to pause.

He had a worksheet from the Mind/Body Medical Institute. Click here for the full set of instructions, but in a nutshell it simply says to sit in a comfortable position, close your eyes, and breathe (the easy part), as you clear your mind of active thoughts (the hard part).

Summers seems like an especially good time to incorporate the practice of pause because schedules can get so busy. You might be thinking: “That’s precisely the problem. I’m so busy I don’t have time to relax for 10 minutes.” But as the yoga instructor who visited my husband’s office mentions on her website, pausing will calm you down and clear your mind for better decision-making, ultimately giving you much more time.     Š

A Meditation Walk

“Let’s take a meditation walk,” my mom suggested when she was visiting earlier this week.

That sounded neat.

“What is it?” I asked.

My mom said it’s when you take a walk in nature while meditating on a word or phrase. As you walk you don’t necessarily seek out specific things, but you do open yourself up to whatever gifts or lessons nature has to teach.

My mom, dad, and I all piled on our coats and boots and headed out into the woods. When we passed the woodshed, we discussed logs. When we passed the garden, we discussed vegetables. We talked about family and food and the gorgeous day. Before long we had finished the loop. Not exactly meditative. Oh, well. We still enjoyed each other’s company and the crisp air of nightfall. That’s priceless in itself.

Meditation walks are probably best when each individual wanders off on his or her own path. This morning I threw on sweatpants and headed outside. I was still wearing my pajama top. I had yet to comb my hair or eat. But I wanted to be outdoors first thing.

I choose to meditate on the words: “I will rejoice and be glad in this day.” The wind brushed against me with affection. The pines played a rustling tune. The sky offered colors of deep blue. The sun poured forth armfuls of warmth. I don’t know what this day will bring, but good or bad, happy or sad, easy or tough, I rejoice in its beauty.Š

Wilted Spinach Salad with Raisins, Pine Nuts, and Walnuts

Ingredients

1 tablespoon raisins
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon pine nuts
½ bag (4.5 ounces) fresh baby spinach
1 clove garlic, crushed
Salt to taste
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 pieces WASA Fiber Rye Crispbread (may substitute any WASA Variety)

Directions

Soak raisins in a small bowl with boiling water for 10 minutes. Drain and set aside.
Heat olive oil in a 12 inch skillet. Add pine nuts, garlic and sauté until garlic turns yellow.
Add spinach and cook for 2 to 3 minutes until spinach is slightly wilted. Add raisins and toss.
Serve on platter with WASA on side or crumble WASA crispbread into salad.

Prep time: 20 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 250
Total Fat 18 g
Saturated Fat 1.8 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 253 mg
Total Carbohydrate 23 g
Dietary Fiber 16 g
Protein 7 g
Calcium 109

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