Category Archives: New England DeafTimes

  Meriden Record-Journal HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Several deaf moviegoers and advocates for the hearing impaired have filed a lawsuit in Connecticut against the Bow Tie movie … To see more…

Hartford Business The Connecticut Association of the Deaf (CAD) filed a lawsuit today against Bow … Advocacy for Persons with Disabilities, the National Association of the Deaf, … See more…

Bangor Daily News Cases of institutional sexual abuse, while horrific in nature and extent, are hopefully accompanied by lessons learned. In the early 1980s, an investigation revealed students at the Governor Baxter School for the Deaf were routinely sexually abused and … Click here to see more…

Quality comes through loud and clear at Maine Deaf Film Festival

Portland Daily Sun “Mea Maxima Culpa: Silence in the House of God,” a documentary by Academy Award-winning director Alex Gibney, investigates the secret crimes of Father Lawrence Murphy, a charismatic Milwaukee priest who abused more than 200 deaf children in a … Click here to see…

HI/DI Working Together – Why and How?

http://gvrrid.org/images/news/2013/HI-DI_Working_Together_Why_and_How_flyer.pdf http://gvrrid.org/270-hi-di-working-together-why-and-how  

Click here to see Catholic DeaFest 2013 flyer

Blessed Self, If you are interested in coming to the retreat, the good news that the price has been reduced from $425 to $375 for 2 nights, 6 healthy meals and registration fee. Please copy and paste the following link: http://www.crossroadsolutionscoach.com/yoga&liferetreatroch2012.pdf Exciting News:  We will have Jeannette Wilson who is a New York State Licensed Deaf Massage […]

  The Board of Directors of the American School for Deaf (ASD) have decided they want to have Gallaudet Hall demolished in 2014. The ASD Board decided this without contacting most of the alumni. Many alumni are very upset about this, and they do not want Gallaudet Hall demolished. This building can be renovated to […]

Broadway World Stories In My Pocket Too is an original theatrical piece developed by NTD Executive Director, Betty Beekman and features the Little Theatre of the Deaf Acting Company; Joey Caverly, Christina Cogswell and Christina Stevens. Each performance of Stories … To see more…

Dance of the Warrior

As few weeks ago, we had a substitute teacher in yoga class. He had us do a series of poses where we moved from one warrior position to another to another then back to the first one. And so on.

The Dance of the Warrior, he called it.

The dictionary defines warrior as “one who is engaged in or experienced in battle.”

The battle in yoga, I suppose, is with the anxious, unstable, and not-so-Zen side of myself.

Can I learn to stay centered in the face of fear?
Can I find my balance when life seems to be throwing me in loops?
Can I take action with insight and compassion?

In other words, can I find the way of the peaceful warrior?

As I moved through the series, my muscles trembled, my body wobbled, and my breath labored. At least, part of the time it was like that. At other times, I was calm(er) and stead(ier) and moving in rhythm. Slowly, I’m learning the dance.

Lazy Bones

During yoga class the teacher, Tina, tells me to lift up a bit. I’m squatting in a pose (it’s sort of this made up pose that I’ve dubbed the Tinasana) and Tina says my middle is sagging.

“The muscles in your body will automatically revert to being lazy if given the chance,” she says.

Lazy? But I’m working so hard, I think.

Later, in Warrior II I’m concentrating on my arms when Tina reminds me to firm my thighs. If I don’t pay attention, they become lazy.

Yet another pose and my feet are splaying instead of pointing in the right direction. Guess why?

Really. Out of all the things in the world, I don’t consider myself lazy. But apparently even when I’m truly working on my alignment there are parts of my body that are secretly trying to get away with as little as possible.

After class I start thinking . . . does that apply to other areas of my life?

No way. I’m motivated! Diligent!Relentless in my pursuits!

Aren’t I?

Except in the mornings. I like to linger in bed. It’s warm and cozy. Plus I’m still sleepy. By the time I do get up, shower, and eat breakfast, I’m always surprised at how much of the day has gotten away from me before I make it to my home office.

And walking. I love my afternoon walks. Love them. Then why do I skip them from time to time, opting instead to sit and work a little longer?

Speaking of work, I realized something as I began investigating this whole laziness issue. If I have ten things on my “To Do” list, I tend to opt for the easiest projects first. When I do start working on a hard topic (say an article that requires a lot of research or possibly a personal essay that forces me to do some inner work), I will drop it as soon as I feel stuck. I tell myself I’ll get back to it and turn my attention to the easier assignments again.

Isn’t it funny the insights yoga gives us into our lives? So if you’ll excuse me, I have an article I’ve put off. I’d better get working on it.

Big on Arms

We are in Virabhadrasana II (Warrior II) and the teacher is walking us through the pose nice and slow. She has us begin in Tadasana (Mountain pose) and then tells us to touch our fingertips together in front of our chest. As we jump our legs apart, our arms open up too (so they are parallel to the ground).

Next, the real instruction begins. She focuses on our feet, making sure they are spaced far enough apart and turned in the proper direction. She reminds us that our back heel should be aligned with our front heel.

She pauses as we breathe.

Inhale, exhale.
Inhale, exhale.

She moves onto our legs. She makes sure that our right knee is bent so that it’s directly over the right ankle. We need to press our thigh back so we can see our second toe. She keeps us focused on our lower body, giving us directions on our tailbone, butt, and – again – our thighs. She mentions that second toe again.

Inhale, exhale.
Inhale, exhale.

You can practically hear the thoughts of every student in the studio: My arms are tired. My arms are so tired! When will this pose be over so we can put our arms down? Are anyone else’s arms tired? Or am I just a wimp? How much longer do we have to hold our arms up?

Finally, the teacher says, “I know your arms are tired.”

Her acknowledgement is a relief even though she encourages us to keep those arms lifted. “Stretch them out even further, reeeaaaaching for the walls,” she says.

She moves onto our shoulder blades – are they scrunched up by our neck? Release them.

Lengthen our torsos.

Broaden our chests.

She knows exactly what we’re doing – allowing our minds to be consumed with thoughts about our arms.

“Your brain starts to panic first,” she says. “Your body is strong and your arms can handle this.”

That’s the extra motivation we need for the last few breaths until she finally has us step our feet back together and place our hands on our hips.

I’m working out in LA for a couple weeks – my old hometown – and it’s great to be back in my favorite teacher’s class. Now that I’m here, I remember she was always big on arms.

Poetry

It’s not often I’m in a yoga class where the teacher gives a reading during closing. But those rare times when that has been the case — well, I’ve adored it. I love words. Language. Poetry. Here’s the quote my yoga teacher read the other day:

Even after all this time
the sun never says to the earth
you owe me.
Look what happens to a love
like that – it lights the whole sky.
– Hafiz

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