Category Archives: South East DeafTimes

CCAD’S DEAF AWARENESS BANQUET - SEPTEMBER 21, 2013 Tickets are available and we accept donations. Thanks, Dr. Frank Lala Chairperson – Deaf Awareness Banquet Founder – Chatham County Association of the Deaf President – Georgia Association of the Deaf  GUEST SPEAKER – Savannah Mayor Edna B. Jackson  DEAF SPEAKERS – CHRIS MERRITT-PATTERSON AND RAY WILLIAMS DEAF […]

Lawsuit against Mount Dora deaf school alleges abuse, neglect

Orlando Sentinel A whistleblowers’ lawsuit filed Thursday and state investigations against the National Deaf Academy in Mount Dora allege that deaf and psychiatric patients at its residential treatment center have suffered serious abuse and neglect and that some … Click here to see …

A deaf man in North Carolina was stabbed after communicating with a friend via sign language.  Terrance Ervin Daniels was attacked with a kitchen knife on January 9, 2013 while walking down the street in Burlington.   The suspect, Robert Jarrell Neal, was captured by the police after the incident.    

Raychellet Williamson told the children at Shannon Elementary School to watch family-friendly TV programs and shows with closed captions during winter break.  In November, she heard a Kent State professor talk about how close captioning improved literacy in Finland.  As a result, she decided all the children at her school should watch family-friendly shows with closed captions. […]

Salisbury Post That’s when Lisa Fink, 34 at the time, says she felt God calling her to learn American Sign Language. There wasn’t an obvious reason for it. She didn’t have any family members or close friends who were deaf. She did encounter a few deaf customers at … See more…

The College of Education at Georgia State University received a $10 million grant to work on improving reading skills for children with hearing loss ranging from mild to profound deafness.  The research will examine techniques for teaching reading skills and assess the effectiveness of those techniques. Gallaudet University released a report on this topic in […]

Deaf and developmentally disabled people in Georgia were not given access to services in Georgia.  Judge Richard W. Story of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia ruled in favor of Deaf Georgians who qualify for mental health and developmental disability services. Judge Story said Georgia needs more mental health professionals with fluent […]

Daytona State board decides to settle 3 lawsuits, add women’s volleyball team

Daytona Beach News-Journal The students who filed a lawsuit with the help of the National Association of the Deaf said the college denied them “effective communication,” such as sign language interpreters and auxiliary aids, so they could succeed. In the television station … Read More….

Remembering the Golden Rule

When we lived in California my husband and I had two bamboo plants – one on our coffee table and one in our kitchen. We had an indoor ivy plant above a corner piece in the living room. And we had a peace lily in a large flowerpot by our front door.

We enjoyed our plants. They livened up our space and added a splash of color.

We even named them: Lucky, Frogger, Stan and Lily.

But we weren’t very organized about feeding them. Half the time we presumed the other person had watered them when in reality neither of us had (we’d check and then panic because their soil was extra dry). Other times we assumed the other person had forgotten to take care of the plants, so we’d both wind up watering them and then over-saturating their soil.

We had a confusing schedule with our dog too. Some days we decided to give her one scoop of food in the morning and another scoop at night. Other days we decide to give her nothing in the morning and two scoops at night. And everyday we’d have a discussion about who fed her, when we fed her, and whether she needed to be fed again. When we moved from California we gave our plants away but kept the dog. Our daily discussions over the feeding routine of our adorable mutt have continued.

We’ve often said to each other: “We need to come up with one schedule for the plants/pets and stick to it.” But no plan we thought of worked very well. Right about the time I was making the switch to Clean Eating. I read an article that suggested feeding your pets and plants before you prepare your own meals.

In other words, serve others before serving yourself.

What a great idea. After all, when I was growing up the golden rule at the dinner table was Offer the food dishes to others before taking it yourself. One summer I worked at a camp where we actually served the person to our right – I would put a piece of chicken, a spoon of broccoli, and a roll on my neighbor’s plate. Then that person would serve the person to her right, and so on…

Feeding pets and plants before meals would not only keep all the living creatures in our household on a regular schedule, it would help us transition into the intention of mindful eating. By stepping back and taking care of the needs of others first, we are reminded of how much has been given to us: our health, our bodies, and the food we are about to put inside it.

Peace & Blessings. Š

Dry Ground

And God said, “Let the water under the sky be gathered to one place, and let dry ground appear.” And it was so. And God saw that it was good. –Genesis 1:9

That verse has been stuck in my head since November.

Outside, I’ll point to our little community yard in front of our townhouse and say, “This hasn’t been dry since we moved in.”

It’s true.

When it’s not covered in snow or ice, it’s a wet, muddy patch of grass. I’m ready for sunshine. For warm air. For dry ground.

Last Saturday, I got my wish. The sun blazed in the sky without a cloud in sight. I was so happy and giddy and overwhelmed with possibilities I wasn’t sure what to do. Should I bike? Rollerblade? Find an outdoor court and play tennis? In the end, I opted for a long walk. I simply wanted to let the fresh air clear my mind.

Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk.

I could’ve stayed on the trail forever.

The day came to a close, and by Sunday morning it was raining again. Our patch of grass was wet and muddy. But there are more warm, dry days ahead. I can feel them. And I’m ready to welcome them with open arms.

Healing Waters

I sink into the water.

Outside, at the hot springs, the air is cool and river still. It smells like sulfur, but after a few minutes I don’t notice. I’m simply lost in the “healing waters.” That’s what they are called because supposedly the minerals in the hot springs help with a number of ailments. Personally, I enjoy the way the heat releases the tension in my body. I especially like soaking my feet – they cramp easily. I also like the heat around the middle of my body – a source of pain between a miscarriage, a surgery, and fertility frustrations over the past 12 months.

I lean back against the stone wall of the bath and watch.

There is a man standing under a waterfall. The water thuds against his back. What is he healing? Tight shoulders? Work stress? Or something deeper . . . the loss of a family member or friend?

In another pool there is a woman with her eyes closed. Maybe she is washing away the pain of divorce. Or abuse. Or a dog named Marley.

I don’t know. I’m just guessing. But when I start thinking about all the different types of “loss” people deal with, it’s clear we all need healing. One of the professors at the university I attended in Southern California just lost his house in the fires. One of my friends just gave birth, a joyful event . . . and a loss of personal time.

Loss of age . . . loss of a job . . . loss of a breast . . . loss of mental agility . . . loss of a city after a move . . . loss of a child who goes off to college . . . and on and on and on it goes.

I read a paragraph in a book the other day about the importance of taking time to heal. The author said that when we step back and heal ourselves we become aware of a world full of people in need. My time of retreat is coming to a close. I hope I don’t go back home and get too wrapped up in schedules and deadlines and the frustrations of city traffic. I hope I can heed the author’s advice and help heal the world in little personal ways. Š

Top 10 Reasons I Love My Juicer

10. My produce never goes to waste anymore

9. No cooking, baking, stirring, or waiting. Just slice, juice, and drink (well, and clean)

8. Extra veggies, extra veggies, extra veggies – for both me and my spouse

7. My dog likes the scraps (dry pulp) mixed in with her meal

6. I feel clean and healthy and energized

5. The machine also makes baby food, nut butters, and pasta

4. Studies show juicing helps prevents disease

3. Juicing offers a great source of enzymes which are often destroyed by heat in cooked foods

2. It is the only way I’ll incorporate beets into my diet

1. Homemade food is the best. Hands down.

I must admit I was nervous about buying a juicer. They aren’t cheap (around $200 for a good one) and I was afraid I’d find juicing too inconvenient, resulting in a new nice appliance simply gathering dust in the corner of the kitchen. But I can’t emphasize enough how much I love it!

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