Category Archives: Texas DeafTimes

The Houston Bass Club of the Deaf in Texas is hosting some events in April 2013.  The 4th Annual Crawfish Event will be on April 20th at the Christia Adair Park.  Then later that month on the 25th to the 27th, they will host the 47th Annual State Team Bass Tournament at Lake Sam Rayburn. […]

Brown Middle School worked with parents of deaf children on a Saturday in January 2013 to help them learn how to communicate with their children.  The Regional Day School Program for the Deaf also had activities for the students while their parents were at the retreat.  25 parents attended that retreat.  

Dr. Victor Henry Galloway, who was the first Deaf superintendent of the Texas School for the Deaf during the 1980′s, was also the first Deaf superintendent of the Scranton State School for the Deaf in Pennsylvania from 1979 – 1981.  He died on January 16, 2013 in Austin, Texas.  He was survived by his wife, Mrs. […]

A national Deaf Hispanic (Latino) conference will be held in Austin, Texas in September.  The National Council of Hispano Deaf and Hard of Hearing are meeting on September 13th through the 16th.  The website for this organization also advertised some other events: The Latino Deaf Youth Leadership will have their pre conference on September 12th and […]

Deaf Baseball and Softball Event

The California School for the Deaf in Riverside is hosting the Hoy XII Baseball and Softball Classic on April 27-28.  During this event, teams from Riverside, CA, Fremont, CA, Indiana, Texas, and Maryland will be competing against each other.  

Do You Have Signs of Male Hair Loss? Finasteride 1mg can Help!

Thinning hair, hair breakage, falling hair – a lot of us will naturally think that these are enough signs that a person is most likely suffering from hair loss.  Nowadays, people who are overly concerned about their hair turn to products that claim to help with hair-related problems.  Fortified shampoos, special conditioners, oils, tonics and supplements are some of the many products in the market these days that promise great-looking healthy hair inside and out.  For some people, they can attest that such products may help keep their hair looking great and healthy; however, they somewhat overlook the fact that maybe their hair is naturally healthy in the first place.  Well, for those who are truly suffering from hair loss, the hair products mentioned above will not be enough to help them with their hair problem, thus they will need extra help. Read more…

Mozzarella, Sun Dried Tomato and Kalamata Olive on Wasa Crispbread

Ingredients

2 ounces fresh mozzarella, sliced thin
4 teaspoons sun dried tomatoes packed in oil, drained, chopped
½ tablespoon pine nuts
2 teaspoons Kalamata olives, pitted, sliced lengthwise into quarters
1 tablespoon fresh basil, thinly sliced
2 pieces WASA Multigrain Crispbread (may substitute any WASA variety)

Directions

Toast pine nuts in small skillet until lightly browned, set aside.
Place 1 ounce mozzarella on each crispbread.
Sprinkle with ½ tablespoon of basil, 2 teaspoons sun dried tomatoes, 1 teaspoon Kalamata olives, ¼ teaspoon pine nuts. Serve immediately.

TIP: Substitute any nuts for pine nuts. Substitute feta cheese for mozzarella if desired.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 279
Total Fat 14 g
Saturated Fat 6 g
Cholesterol 36 mg
Sodium 584 mg
Total Carbohydrate 25 g
Dietary Fiber 5 g
Protein 17 g
Calcium 456 mg

Secret Ingredient

Does anyone know the secret ingredient that goes into making the perfect Smoothie? I can’t figure it out. My blender and I have been bonding lately as I try out different recipes. In addition to ice and some frozen strawberries and blueberries, I try:

Smoothies with frozen banana.

Smoothies with frozen banana and whey protein powder.

Smoothies without either.

Smoothies with honey. Smoothies with Stevia. Smoothies with an egg. Smoothies with soy milk.

No matter what I do, they simply don’t taste as good as the kind I buy. It’s not that they taste bad, but after a few sips I kinda forget about them. When I find the abandoned half-empty glass later on, I feel like I’ve wasted food. One does not forget about a really good Smoothie.

At first I thought maybe it was because when I buy Smoothies they’re probably full of sugar and ice cream or something. But no, I thoroughly enjoyed the Smoothies I drank every afternoon at a yoga retreat in Mexico last February – everything that kitchen prepared was of the healthy, no-sugar variety. I fondly recall sitting under a shade tree at the beach in the afternoons (after a morning of working out) and looking forward to seeing the resort’s chef saunter over with his latest concoction. Wait a sec…the secret ingredient I’m missing? I think it might be the beach. That is, after all, the only place I really ever drink Smoothies. There’s something about the white sand and the turquoise waters and reading a good book that makes a Smoothie taste so perfectly good.

I live far, far away from the beach.

Well, shoot.Š

Big on Arms

We are in Virabhadrasana II (Warrior II) and the teacher is walking us through the pose nice and slow. She has us begin in Tadasana (Mountain pose) and then tells us to touch our fingertips together in front of our chest. As we jump our legs apart, our arms open up too (so they are parallel to the ground).

Next, the real instruction begins. She focuses on our feet, making sure they are spaced far enough apart and turned in the proper direction. She reminds us that our back heel should be aligned with our front heel.

She pauses as we breathe.

Inhale, exhale.
Inhale, exhale.

She moves onto our legs. She makes sure that our right knee is bent so that it’s directly over the right ankle. We need to press our thigh back so we can see our second toe. She keeps us focused on our lower body, giving us directions on our tailbone, butt, and – again – our thighs. She mentions that second toe again.

Inhale, exhale.
Inhale, exhale.

You can practically hear the thoughts of every student in the studio: My arms are tired. My arms are so tired! When will this pose be over so we can put our arms down? Are anyone else’s arms tired? Or am I just a wimp? How much longer do we have to hold our arms up?

Finally, the teacher says, “I know your arms are tired.”

Her acknowledgement is a relief even though she encourages us to keep those arms lifted. “Stretch them out even further, reeeaaaaching for the walls,” she says.

She moves onto our shoulder blades – are they scrunched up by our neck? Release them.

Lengthen our torsos.

Broaden our chests.

She knows exactly what we’re doing – allowing our minds to be consumed with thoughts about our arms.

“Your brain starts to panic first,” she says. “Your body is strong and your arms can handle this.”

That’s the extra motivation we need for the last few breaths until she finally has us step our feet back together and place our hands on our hips.

I’m working out in LA for a couple weeks – my old hometown – and it’s great to be back in my favorite teacher’s class. Now that I’m here, I remember she was always big on arms.

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