Hartford Business

The Connecticut Association of the Deaf (CAD) filed a lawsuit today against Bow Advocacy for Persons with Disabilities, the National Association of the Deaf


ConsumerAffairs

ConsumerAffairs’ founder and editor, Jim Hood formerly headed Associated Press Broadcast News, directing coverage of major news events worldwide. He also 

Dr. E. Lynn Jacobowitz, Co-Owner, ASL Rose
LYNN’S ASL LITERARY SHOW
Friday, August 2, 2013
Door Opens at 7. Show begins at 7:30
Rochester Recreation Club for the Deaf 1564 Lyell Ave
Rochester, NY 14606
Members – Free. Non-members $2


Rochester Deaf Rotary



 Trenton Senior Citizens Club News
 Sunday, July 7, 2013

New Jersey Association of the Deaf, Inc.
 proudly host 23rd Biennial State Conference
at Ocean County College, 1 College Drive, Toms River, NJ
on Saturday, November 9, 2013
8am – 5:30 pm
Continental breakfast, Forum, Workshops, Exhibits, Award/Luncheon, General Meeting, Election of Officers
6pm – 9pm
Dinner Gala, Inauguration, Deaf Art Auction and Deaf Comedian Show
More information, please go to www.njadspotlight.wix.com/njad; to register before October 31, 2013.


  
Sunday, November 17, 2013
12 noon to 4 pm
at the Hamilton Manor
30 Route 156 (off Route 130)
Hamilton Township NJ 08620
Entree Choice:
Char-Grilled Slice Sirloin
Chicken Marsala
 includes appetizer, salad, vegetables, coffee, tea, soda and dessert
 plus  3 free 50-50 ticket
Member $45     Non-member $50
We accept 2-4 month payments … Pay in Full by October 30, 2013
Door Prize  -  50/50 Drawings
For more info or question, contact  Laura Schultz, Chair:   or  Sue George, co-chair:   or Philip DiMaio:

Hearty Vegetable Lentil Soup

We’ve been making this lentil soup* all winter. We finally have it down:

I pour 5 cups of organic, low sodium chicken broth into the big pot.
Ron chops 2 celery stalks, 1 large carrot, and minces 2 cloves of garlic.
I chop 1 medium onion, 1 red pepper, and 1 green pepper. Then measure out 1 cup of dry lentils.

We toss this first batch of ingredients into the pot and stir. Turn on the burner and, after it begins to boil, reduce it to a simmer for 40 minutes.

While it’s cooking, Ron and I are back to the cutting boards.

He’s got 3 red potatoes.
I have 1 zucchini.
He measures out the curry powder and basil (half a teaspoon each).
I measure out a half a cup of organic tomato sauce and drain a can of diced tomatoes.

Our second batch of ingredients goes in the pot for an extra 15 minutes at the end.

We keep sourdough bread in the freezer, and Ron thaws it out and toasts it up so we can dip it in the soup.

So tasty.

It’s the only part of winter I’m gonna miss.

~~~

*recipe from a Pritikin book I found on my parents’ bookshelf

The Plan: Finding the Path to Clean Eating

Once I decided to adopt a Clean Eating lifestyle I realized I needed a Plan. ASAP.

I broke my Plan into three parts.

Part One

I read a number of books and browsed websites (including Mercola.com, DrWeil.com, Pritikin.com and EatWasaFeelGood.com (the Best Life page has good snacks/recipes)). Then I sat down Saturday morning and outlined a meals for the week as well as guidelines for eating. In a nutshell: I want to wildly increase my intake of vegetables, drastically decrease my consumption of animal products (a maximum of one serving per day), and eliminate sugar, refined flour, caffeine, and alcohol.

Let me add a disclaimer: I’m not a doctor, a nutritionist, or a dietitian. I am simply a 33-year-old woman trying to eat clean foods after discovering that the third ingredient in my “healthy” cereal was sugar and my 100% whole wheat bread contained high fructose corn syrup. Also, I fully intend to tweak my eating habits as I explore what works for my body.

So – back to the Plan. Some changes would be easy. For example, I already found nearby farms to frequent. Eating locally grown grass-fed chicken would hopefully be smooth sailing. Some changes would be hard. I’ve spent the last few weeks weaning myself off of the very large cup of coffee I drink each morning and replacing it with caffeine-free herbal tea. I miss the aroma of those Kona beans! Some changes I’m still on the fence about, like dairy products. I’ve heard all sorts of arguments and ideas (both pro and con) when it comes to milk, cheese, and eggs. This is going to require more investigation. I’m heading to a farm in Virginia next week to learn more about raw milk.

Part Two

The second part of my plan involved making a list of my ailments. I want to track my physical problems over the course of a year and observe improvements. I’ll spare you the entire litany of conditions, but here are a few:

Eyesight: will drinking fresh homemade vegetable juice and eating clean foods restore my eyesight to the point where my prescription is weakened or obsolete?

Skin Problems: in addition to acne (yes, I’m still breaking out at age 33), my skin doctor is constantly chopping off “suspicious” looking moles. She says they’re benign but she also calls them a not-so-pretty word that I can’t pronounce. I’d love to start getting a clean bill of health during my annual dermatology appointments.

Colds: I’ve heard of people who haven’t had a cold in 30 years. Sign me up. No more colds!

Endometriosis/Infertility: This will be the most personal challege. Endometriosis has not only caused severe physical pain, but has resulted in surgery where the doctor had to remove a cyst the size of a cantaloupe as well as most of my ovary. Plus it has caused problems with fertility. I’m thinking…will Clean Eating restore my hormone balances and clear the way for a healthy pregnancy? We’ll see.

Part Three

The final part of my plan seemed crucial: restaurants. I Googled all the restaurants within 30 miles of my home that serve local, organic fare. Then I taped the list to our refrigerator. If I’m ever too exhausted to cook or if I completely demolish a recipe as I experiment in the kitchen, my husband and I can escape to these spots – one of which is a restaurant that serves vegetarian Indian cuisine. Score!

Wasa with Feta, Cherry Tomatoes and Red Onion

Ingredients

1 tablespoon red onion, sliced thin
2 tablespoons crumbled reduced-fat feta cheese
2 leaves fresh basil
¼ cup cherry or grape tomatoes cut in half
2 pieces WASA Fiber Rye Crispbread (may substitute other WASA Crispbread flavors)

Directions

Place tomatoes on cracker.
Sprinkle with feta cheese. Top with onion and basil and serve.

Tip: substitute fresh mozzarella or goat cheese for feta cheese

Prep time: 10 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 54
Total Fat 2 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Cholesterol 7 mg
Sodium 141 mg
Total Carbohydrate 7 g
Dietary Fiber 3 g
Protein 3 g
Calcium 6% of daily value

Man in the Mud

Panic.

It’s a “sudden overwhelming fear, with or without cause, that produces hysterical or irrational behavior” according dictionary.com.

I’ve certainly been guilty of it. But it usually doesn’t serve me well. Like the time I convinced myself I had appendicitis and went into such hysterics that I passed out.

I came across this story last week – a construction worker in China was buried alive in the mud with nothing but a gap of air in front of his face (his helmet slid down). He didn’t panic. He practiced meditation and survived two hours on an amount of air that should have lasted five minutes.

I wonder sometimes how I would react in certain situations. What if I was eating in Windows restaurant at the top of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11? What if I was in one of the hijacked planes? I don’t think a person truly knows how he or she will respond unless in the situation. God willing, that will never be the case, but if it is, I hope I am like the man in the mud.

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