Tag Archives: Closed Captions

Creating Opportunities for Deaf Employment Innovation Diversity Empowerment Access (CODE-IDEA) offers videos in ASL and captions for employers who want to hire deaf and hard of hearing people and for job seekers.  They are also offering an I-Pad for their Deaf@work contest.  Photographs need to be submitted by February 7, 2013 to qualify for this contest. […]

Raychellet Williamson told the children at Shannon Elementary School to watch family-friendly TV programs and shows with closed captions during winter break.  In November, she heard a Kent State professor talk about how close captioning improved literacy in Finland.  As a result, she decided all the children at her school should watch family-friendly shows with closed captions. […]

Many movies in theatres are not accessible to deaf and hard of hearing people.  This month, advocates for deaf and hard of hearing people are urging movie theatres to provide captions for movies.  An online press room has been set up to provide information about this captioning campaign.  The campaign is sponsored by the Collaborative […]

Last month, a closed captions software company, CPC, received the National  Association of the Deaf’s (NAD) prestigious Accessibility Award. The award  was presented during its biennial conference in Louisville, Kentucky on  July 4th. NAD President, Bobbie Beth Scoggins said the awards recognizes individuals and  organizations across the country that have improved lives for deaf and hard-of-hearing […]

Posting Captioned Videos on YouTube

Have you ever tried putting a closed captioned YouTube video onto your website?  To make sure the captions will automatically be on those videos, here is how to get it to work properly. After the movie URL, use quotation marks before and after inserting the following information:  &cc_load_policy=1. inside quotation marks. The default setting for […]

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Plaintiffs Charge that Netflix Violates the Americans with Disabilities Act by Not Providing Equal Access to its “Watch Instantly” Streaming Content. An estimated 36 million Americans are deaf or hard of hearing. The deaf and hard of hearing community has repeatedly expressed concerns—via letters, petitions, blogs, and social media—to Netflix […]

Action Alert: Say No to Legalized Discrimination at Movie Theaters (NAD)

(DEAFTIMES: Check this out from NAD. Re: Possible Discrimination at Movies with Captioning) http://www.nad.org/news/2011/1/action-alert-say-no-legalized-discrimination-movie-theaters

On the heels of the 20th anniversary of the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley will today announce settlements her office has reached with the largest national movie theater chains to provide deaf and blind patrons with access at all of their locations in Massachusetts.

For Immediate Release Wednesday, May 5, 2010 Contacts: Rosaline Crawford (NAD) (Voice and TTY) Eric Bridges (ACB) Adrianna Montague-Gray (AFB) Jenifer Simpson (AAPD) Senators Mark Pryor and John Kerry Introduce the Equal Access to 21st Century Communications Act (S. 3304) May 5, 2010, Washington, DC:–The Coalition of Organizations for Accessible Technology […]

As we predicted and hoped, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled today that the Americans with Disabilities Act requires movie theaters to show closed-captioned movies unless doing so would constitute an “undue burden.” The ruling came in a case that the Arizona Attorney General’s Office filed against the Harkins theater chain. The federal district […]

Welcome, Loved One

A few weeks ago I was in Tulum, Mexico for a week of yoga, meditation and silent beach walks. I arrived at night after everyone else had gone to sleep. Inside my cabana two flickering candles revealed a comfy bed draped in mosquito netting with a welcome card on the pillow. I picked up the card and read what was written. Holding it next to my heart I smiled. Then I crawled under the covers and drifted off to sleep.

The next morning as I was journaling in my notebook, I thought about the card and scribbled down what it had said: You are worth loving. I had a funny feeling that what I wrote wasn’t quite right, so I went back to my cabana to double-check. Sure enough, I had misquoted the card. It actually read: I am worth loving.

Notice the difference?

Why is it so easy to believe others are worth loving, but so hard to believe it about ourselves? Why is it difficult to say? To know? To live?

This isn’t a narcissistic kind of love; rather, it’s a “love your neighbor as yourself” kind of love. Eating mindfully, treating ourselves with kindness, practicing yoga — these are ways we can love ourselves by being stewards of our body and soul.

I began practicing yoga years ago after watching my then-boyfriend (now husband) ease into a backbend with grace. To this day I still can’t do that, but it doesn’t matter because self-love is about accepting myself for who I am, not what I can achieve. I will be blogging about yoga twice a week for the Eat Wasa Feel Good team (my partner, Zandria, introduced herself yesterday as the vegan blogger).

So here’s a warm welcome to you, loved one, and an invitation to join me on this journey. Feel free to post comments, questions or ideas. You can also e-mail me or visit my personal blog, Roughly Speaking.

Oh, by the way, my name is Jenny. And I am worth loving.

Not Quite Tuna

Tonight for dinner I made tuna salad…without tuna…or mayo.

How, you might ask, did I make such meal?

With vegetables and seasoning.

I’m trying to incorporate as many veggies into my diet as I can, so I’m always on the lookout for new recipes. One of the most interesting I’ve seen so far is “Better than Tuna” from this book. First, I whipped out my food processor. Then I discovered my food processor was broken, so I whipped out a knife and cutting board. I finely chopped three big carrots, two celery stalks, a quarter of an onion, half a red pepper, and a tomato. I drained the tomato and threw all the veggies in a bowl.

For the seasoning I mixed in one-half teaspoon Celtic sea salt, one Tablespoon parsley, one-half teaspoon kelp, and three Tablespoons of Vegenaise.

Looking at the concoction, I wasn’t sure what to think. It looked pretty appetizing, but there was only one way to find out for sure. I served the “tuna” in a toasted whole wheat hamburger bun. I also set out a platter of blue corn tortillas with hummus (I cut the tortillas into “chips” and baked them in the oven first). To drink? Fresh vegetable juice.

Numma, numma, numma. It was delicious. I highly recommend it (hopefully your food processor is working though because all that chopping was labor intensive). I’m so excited for lunch tomorrow to eat the leftovers.Š

One-Way Street

For years I pounded the pavement. As a runner, my feet hit the cement over and over as I competed in cross-country, track, and, as an adult, even a couple marathons.

My coaches always encouraged stretching, both before and after the runs, but for the most part, I was on a one-way street toward shortening and tighenting my muscles. Until I tried yoga, I had no idea what it really meant to enlongate them. Running made me so inflexible that because of my inability to touch my toes or do the splits, I thought I “couldn’t do yoga.” Yoga was for bendy people, like gymnasts.

Thank goodness I figured out my thinking was flawed at age 30 and not a minute later. The benefits of yoga for inflexible people are amazing. Yes, it’s true that having shorter muscles means I often need to use a lot of props and adjust my poses in way others don’t, but almost every single time I practice yoga, I find myself thinking, “This feels so good.” After years of heading “one way” I’m finally teaching my body to move in the opposite direction. Ahh.

Man in the Mud

Panic.

It’s a “sudden overwhelming fear, with or without cause, that produces hysterical or irrational behavior” according dictionary.com.

I’ve certainly been guilty of it. But it usually doesn’t serve me well. Like the time I convinced myself I had appendicitis and went into such hysterics that I passed out.

I came across this story last week – a construction worker in China was buried alive in the mud with nothing but a gap of air in front of his face (his helmet slid down). He didn’t panic. He practiced meditation and survived two hours on an amount of air that should have lasted five minutes.

I wonder sometimes how I would react in certain situations. What if I was eating in Windows restaurant at the top of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11? What if I was in one of the hijacked planes? I don’t think a person truly knows how he or she will respond unless in the situation. God willing, that will never be the case, but if it is, I hope I am like the man in the mud.

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