Tag Archives: discrimination

The topic of this conference is “Deaf Learners – the past, the present, What about our FUTURE?”  ’Raising Deaf potential through education!’  The conference is supported by the Office of Disability Issues, and the conference will be held at the University of Westminster.  Early bird tickets are offered until April 12, 2013.  

An independent federal agency, The National Council on Disability (NCD), has a deaf man as their new Chairperson.  Jeff Rosen, a third-generation deaf person involved with the disability movement,  has been the General Counsel for ZVRS.  He is an attorney who has been involved with other deaf and disability organizations.  

Gallaudet University has planned activities in February and March to honor the 25th anniversary of its Deaf President Now (DPN) movement.  As a result of DPN, Gallaudet got its first deaf president.  

Michael Argenyi, a medical student at Creighton University in Omaha,  has filed a lawsuit against the school for not providing transcribers and interpreters.  Argenyi took out more than $110,000 in loans to pay for transcribers and interpreters during his first two years of medical school.  Then he left during the third year of medical school […]

Proposed FCC Action Threatens Future VRS Services

The Greater Los Angeles Agency on Deafness has asked people to “Save My VRS.”  Sorenson initiated the “Save My VRS” campaign in response to proposed regulations from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).  The FCC has proposed to replace Video Relay Service (VRS) with Smart TV’s and IPADs, and those are not designed for deaf and hard of hearing […]

A deaf man in California tried to communicate with AccountNow via e-mail.  He had recently become deaf due to a stroke.  The company insisted on communicating with him via telephone, and he was unable to use the phone.  Richard Halaviais, who had difficulty with paying his medical bills due to not being able to get […]

Doctor to Pay Patient Because He Did Not Provide Interpreter

Dr. David Bullek of New Jersey settled a complaint from a deaf patient who made an appointment to see him in 2006.  The state Civil Rights Division said he also agreed to attend training to learn about reasonable accommodation for patients with disabilities.  

Deaf and developmentally disabled people in Georgia were not given access to services in Georgia.  Judge Richard W. Story of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia ruled in favor of Deaf Georgians who qualify for mental health and developmental disability services. Judge Story said Georgia needs more mental health professionals with fluent […]

According to a lawsuit against some state agencies, Deaf and hard-of-hearing state employees have had lack of access and have faced discrimination.  The lawsuit against state agencies was filed last Friday by Joshua Konecky in the San Francisco Superior Court.  Mr. Konecky is seeking other state employees who want to get involved with this class action lawsuit.

Action Alert: Say No to Legalized Discrimination at Movie Theaters (NAD)

(DEAFTIMES: Check this out from NAD. Re: Possible Discrimination at Movies with Captioning) http://www.nad.org/news/2011/1/action-alert-say-no-legalized-discrimination-movie-theaters

Scrub-A-Dub-Dub

Here’s a little secret: I practiced yoga for 12 months before I finally washed my mat . . . okay, 18 months . . . um, maybe more like 24. Yep, I’m pretty sure it was over two years before I grabbed a washcloth and filled a bucket with warm soapy water. For the record, my mat wasn’t too dirty. I tend to prefer the Iyengar approach to yoga over styles that involve a heated rooms or a lot of fast movement, so I’m usually not dripping sweat during classes. But despite that, and regardless of how often I’d wash my feet before sessions, I began to notice soiled circles where my heels pressed into the mat. I should wash this, I would think to myself during Downward Facing Dog. Yep that’s definitely dirt, I’d say to myself as I gazed at grime during Plank. After class I would roll up my mat, take it home, and promptly forget my pledge. Finally one day I plunged my hand into a bucket and went to work. It’s very easy. Following these directions, I unrolled my mat on a clean tile surface, washed it with a cloth (two cups of water to four drops of dish soap), and then rinsed it by wiping it down with a damp cloth followed by a dry one. Much better. Next class, I practically felt like I was using a brand new mat. It’s funny – sometimes when I take the time to care for something external, it feels like an internal cleansing.Š

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On the Road

Had my first cup of coffee in a long time the other day (well, a month, which is long for me!). I was on an airplane heading to Los Angeles and there is nothing I like about planes. Can’t stand the smell, the sounds, the uncomfortable seats, the bathrooms. Can’t stand how my head feels when I read (dizzy) and how my body feels no matter how still I sit (woozy).

I wanted something pleasant. The coffee smelled good, and I figured a cup or two wouldn’t hurt (I mean, heck, those cups on the plane are so little). Well, the next day I had a massive headache. So much for my theory that it wouldn’t hurt – it hurt a lot. I think on the flight home I’ll opt for decaf.

Since arriving, I’ve been sipping non-caffeinated herbal teas like crazy – it’s cold and rainy. Anyway, one of the many things I love about California is the fresh produce. With year-round farmer’s markets and a city full of restaurants that serve up lots of organic fare, it’s great to be here again.

I visited my old book club group the other night where there was a delicious raw veggie salad from Wolfgang Puck’s. Been eating fruit medleys (yum – it’s been awhile since I’ve had fresh, flavorful fruit – wish I could share it with all of you braving the winter snow back east). Today I enjoyed an organic greens salad at my favorite lunch spot, Coral Tree Café (I also had a big, ol’ brownie there – not so healthy, but very tasty).

I do miss cooking though. I’ve really come to enjoy making homemade meals. My husband was shocked when he looked at our budget the other night and realized how much we’ve cut back on eating out at restaurants. Ends up I have a mini-fridge in the hotel out here. In the morning I’ll be off to the local grocer to cobble together some wholesome goodies I can make right in my room. Š

Retraining Taste Buds

The carrots I hold in my hand are fresh from a local garden. They’re dirty and have wild bushy green tops. I wash and peel the carrots then pick up the knife. I have a long way to go until I can maneuver this utensil like those chefs on the Food Network, but I’m getting better. Faster.

I cut the carrots, chop the onion, dice the celery, slice the mushrooms and throw everything into a skillet with water. While the veggies are steam sautéing I boil tri-colored pasta in a medium pot and steam spinach in a small one. I add tomatoes and tomato sauce to the skillet. When the pasta and spinach are ready I add those too, along with garlic and oregano.

My husband, Ron, wanders in the kitchen.

“What’s for dinner?” he asks.

“Italian Skillet Casserole,” I say.

He leans over my shoulder and investigates the simmering dish on the stovetop.

“Almost all veggies,” I point out.

Cooking healthier foods has been challenging in certain ways, but one thing I completely forgot about when I started this new path is that my husband can’t stand vegetables. He’ll eat certain items (broccoli or beans or salad) because he knows they’re good for him, but he would prefer them as a side dish, not the main dish.

But it just so happens that his company is having a Vegetable Challenge this summer.

So perfect timing.

I scoop out the meal into two bowls, light some candles, and sit down.

It’s delicious, and I look at Ron to see what he thinks. He’s pushing a piece of onion, a hunk of tomato, and a mushroom slice to the side. “I can eat them when they’re small, but these big pieces…” he shakes his head.

“You need to retrain your taste buds,” I suggest softly.

He’s a good sport so he takes a huge spoonful, onion chunks and all, and gives it a go. He likes it. This truly is one of the tastier dishes I’ve made, and when I’m done I push my bowl aside and lean back in the chair.

“Hey, what’s that?” Ron says, peering into my bowl.

“Nothing,” I say.

“Uh-huh,” Ron nods, smirking.

Okay, okay. So I really do consider myself a vegetable lover, but I’ve always struggled with cooked carrots. There is small pile of them left. I guess we both have some retraining to work through.

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