Tag Archives: Job

Ohlone College COUNSELOR FOR DEAF/HARD OF HEARING Full-Time Tenure-Track Counseling Faculty Position – Start Fall 2013 APPLICATION DEADLINE: April 19, 2013 at 5:00 PM Starting Salary Range: $61,274 to $93,225 IDEAL CANDIDATE Ohlone College seeks to employ counseling faculty who have a passion for counseling and a strong commitment to the missions and ideals of […]

The Biology Department at Gallaudet University is accepting applications for summer internships for deaf or hard of hearing science undergraduate students.  They will continue to accept applications until they have chosen their students for internships.  Six internships are available – three for a genetics project, and three for an ecology project.  The summer internships start on […]

Creating Opportunities for Deaf Employment Innovation Diversity Empowerment Access (CODE-IDEA) offers videos in ASL and captions for employers who want to hire deaf and hard of hearing people and for job seekers.  They are also offering an I-Pad for their Deaf@work contest.  Photographs need to be submitted by February 7, 2013 to qualify for this contest. […]

POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: INTERPRETER TRAINER/ OUTREACH SPECIALIST   ORGANIZATION: Deaf and Hard of Hearing Advocacy Resource Center (DHHARC) is a statewide advocacy, resource, telecommunications distribution, and direct service center offering services throughout Nevada.  DHHARC has two offices: one in Reno/Sparks and one in Las Vegas. GENERAL INFORMATION: Type of appointment: Full time, non-exempt employee Location: Position […]

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Advocacy Resource Center POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Executive Director ORGANIZATION: The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Advocacy Resource Center (DHHARC) is a NEVADA statewide advocacy, resource, telecommunications distribution, and direct service center.  DHHARC has offices in Reno/Sparks and Las Vegas. GENERAL INFORMATION: Type of appointment: Full-Time/at-will Location: Reno/Sparks and Las Vegas Posting […]

ASADV ED Position Announcement

Gallaudet University President Dr. Alan Hurwitz, put Chief Diversity Officer (CDO) Dr. Angela McCaskill on administrative leave on Wednesday, October 10, 2012 because she signed a petition regarding same-sex marriage in Maryland.  Yesterday, Dr. McCaskill said she wanted her old job back.  In the news yesterday, Dr. Hurwitz said he wanted Dr. McCaskill to come back to […]

The California School for the Deaf at Riverside is taking action to help Deaf people get jobs.  All of their high school students are required to take vocational education, regardless of their future plans.  They are also required to do an internship for one summer.  They are still required to take academic classes along with […]

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Deaf and Hard of Hearing Advocacy Resource Center POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Executive Director ORGANIZATION: The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Advocacy Resource Center (DHHARC) is a NEVADA statewide advocacy, resource, telecommunications distribution, and direct service center.  DHHARC has offices in Reno/Sparks and Las Vegas. GENERAL INFORMATION: Type of appointment: Full-Time/at-will Location: Reno/Sparks and Las Vegas Compensation: […]

Yoga Wagon

Kerplunk!

I fell off the yoga wagon.

Haven’t been to a class in over two weeks. My life is shifting right now, causing my schedule to bumble around. First, my spouse and I are preparing to move to Virginia. It’s just a hop, skip, and a jump away from where we are now, but we still need to pack up and load every dish, book, and piece of furniture. I’ve been donating stuff and shredding files like crazy. I started playing tennis again, and I’m adding a writing class as well as a writing workshop to my week. Not to mention my freelancing is picking up, I’ve been spending more time in the kitchen due to Clean Eating, and my husband and I are dealing with the emotional turmoil of fertility issues as we try to start a family. The yoga studio is a good 30-minute drive from my house. No wonder I haven’t been making it over there lately.

I remember when I was a law student I was particularly stressed out one semester. At the time I was debating adopting a puppy. “Try to minimize the stress in your life,” my parents cautioned. I adopted the puppy anyway, but I thought it was good advice. Even though I’m excited about the events in my life (moving, taking a class, more work assignments), change takes its toll. What can I do to minimize the stress?

I let go of a column that I enjoyed writing but that didn’t pay. I asked my husband to take over some of the dinner duties (grilled salmon, yum!). My parents are going to help with the move. Also, there is a yoga studio that is closer to my current place. I’ll try it out next time. I feel calmer already.Š

Blue Zones

Blue Zones are places in the world where people live “astoundingly long lives” – for example, reaching the age of 100 three times the rate of Americans. And suffering a fifth the rate of heart disease. Imagine being able to hold your great-great-grandchild one day . . .

I first learned of Blue Zones when one of the editors I work with went on a “Quest” to the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica, one of the four Blue Zones (the others are Okinawa, Japan, Loma Linda, California, and Sardinia, Italy).

Dan Buettner, a journalist who worked extensively on researching these communities, has come out with a book titled The Blue Zone. I want to read the book in context, so I’m refraining from skipping ahead, but based on the Blue Zones website and other articles I’ve read, I know some of the lifestyle practices of centurions are (1) plant based diets (not necessarily vegetarian, but plant-based); (2) laughter; (3) spirituality; (4) family; and (5) physically active lives (like gardening and laboring).

Just because Washington DC isn’t a Blue Zone doesn’t mean my body and my house can’t be one.

Remembering the Golden Rule

When we lived in California my husband and I had two bamboo plants – one on our coffee table and one in our kitchen. We had an indoor ivy plant above a corner piece in the living room. And we had a peace lily in a large flowerpot by our front door.

We enjoyed our plants. They livened up our space and added a splash of color.

We even named them: Lucky, Frogger, Stan and Lily.

But we weren’t very organized about feeding them. Half the time we presumed the other person had watered them when in reality neither of us had (we’d check and then panic because their soil was extra dry). Other times we assumed the other person had forgotten to take care of the plants, so we’d both wind up watering them and then over-saturating their soil.

We had a confusing schedule with our dog too. Some days we decided to give her one scoop of food in the morning and another scoop at night. Other days we decide to give her nothing in the morning and two scoops at night. And everyday we’d have a discussion about who fed her, when we fed her, and whether she needed to be fed again. When we moved from California we gave our plants away but kept the dog. Our daily discussions over the feeding routine of our adorable mutt have continued.

We’ve often said to each other: “We need to come up with one schedule for the plants/pets and stick to it.” But no plan we thought of worked very well. Right about the time I was making the switch to Clean Eating. I read an article that suggested feeding your pets and plants before you prepare your own meals.

In other words, serve others before serving yourself.

What a great idea. After all, when I was growing up the golden rule at the dinner table was Offer the food dishes to others before taking it yourself. One summer I worked at a camp where we actually served the person to our right – I would put a piece of chicken, a spoon of broccoli, and a roll on my neighbor’s plate. Then that person would serve the person to her right, and so on…

Feeding pets and plants before meals would not only keep all the living creatures in our household on a regular schedule, it would help us transition into the intention of mindful eating. By stepping back and taking care of the needs of others first, we are reminded of how much has been given to us: our health, our bodies, and the food we are about to put inside it.

Peace & Blessings. Š

Big on Arms

We are in Virabhadrasana II (Warrior II) and the teacher is walking us through the pose nice and slow. She has us begin in Tadasana (Mountain pose) and then tells us to touch our fingertips together in front of our chest. As we jump our legs apart, our arms open up too (so they are parallel to the ground).

Next, the real instruction begins. She focuses on our feet, making sure they are spaced far enough apart and turned in the proper direction. She reminds us that our back heel should be aligned with our front heel.

She pauses as we breathe.

Inhale, exhale.
Inhale, exhale.

She moves onto our legs. She makes sure that our right knee is bent so that it’s directly over the right ankle. We need to press our thigh back so we can see our second toe. She keeps us focused on our lower body, giving us directions on our tailbone, butt, and – again – our thighs. She mentions that second toe again.

Inhale, exhale.
Inhale, exhale.

You can practically hear the thoughts of every student in the studio: My arms are tired. My arms are so tired! When will this pose be over so we can put our arms down? Are anyone else’s arms tired? Or am I just a wimp? How much longer do we have to hold our arms up?

Finally, the teacher says, “I know your arms are tired.”

Her acknowledgement is a relief even though she encourages us to keep those arms lifted. “Stretch them out even further, reeeaaaaching for the walls,” she says.

She moves onto our shoulder blades – are they scrunched up by our neck? Release them.

Lengthen our torsos.

Broaden our chests.

She knows exactly what we’re doing – allowing our minds to be consumed with thoughts about our arms.

“Your brain starts to panic first,” she says. “Your body is strong and your arms can handle this.”

That’s the extra motivation we need for the last few breaths until she finally has us step our feet back together and place our hands on our hips.

I’m working out in LA for a couple weeks – my old hometown – and it’s great to be back in my favorite teacher’s class. Now that I’m here, I remember she was always big on arms.

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