Tag Archives: NECA

TRS Ex Parte –GC Docket No. 10-51 12/1/10—Sorenson and Madison Dearborn Partners met with Paul de Sa of the OSP to discuss VRS issues.  Sorenson and Madison Dearborn discussed the role of customer relationship between the default user and VRS provider in ensuring that deaf and hard-of-hearing Americans have functionally equivalent VRS services.  Sorenson and […]

TRS CG Docket No. 10-210 11/29/10—Late-filed replies on the implementation of the requirement for a National Deaf-Blind Equipment Distribution Program, per Section 105 of the 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010. Public Notice Inclusive Technologies

TRS Ex Parte—CG Docket No. 10-51 10/19/10—Hamilton Relay met with Karen Peltz Strauss of the CGB to discuss its request for clarification of a February 2010 Declaratory Ruling. Hamilton Relay reiterated its support of numerous providers who believe that various calls involving more than one Communications Assistant (CA) are compensable relay calls, and the effect […]

The Deal Magazine By Richard Morgan Published October 1, 2010 at 12:37 PM Public trust and private equity are at odds almost by definition. But when it comes to serving American citizens with hearing or speech disabilities, they’re at loggerheads. Witness the schism between the Federal Communications Commission and the market leader in video relay […]

TRS NPRM—CG Docket No. 03-123 9/17/10—The FCC released an NPRM seeking comment on the steps the FCC should take to improve assignment of telephone numbers associated with Internet-based Telecommunications Relay Service, specifically Video Relay Service and IP Relay. Comments due 30 days after publication in the Federal Register; replies due 45 days after publication.

TRS CG Docket No. 10-51 Replies filed on the 2010 VRS Reform NPRM on issues regarding location of VRS Call Centers, VRS Communications Assistants (CAs) working from home, and compensation, and whistleblower protections for VRS CAs and other provider employees. Comments due Sept. 16. Sorenson PAH ! VRS

TRS CG Docket No. 10-51 9/14/10—Additional comments were filed on the 2010 VRS Reform NPRM. Further comments can be reviewed in the September 14, 2010 edition of Washington Watch. Replies due Sept. 27. Sorenson Purple Communications Hamilton Relay

NECA Washington Watch

TRS Reply Comments – CG Docket No. 10-51 Early reply comments filed on the NOI seeking comment VRS rules. Snap Telecommunications

TRS 8/27/10—Chairman Genachowski responded to a number of letters from members of Congress regarding VRS issues.  Chairman Genachowski said the rates adopted in the June 28th Order ensure VRS providers recover from the VRS Fund only the reasonable costs caused by provision of VRS service.  Chairman Genachowski also said the VRS NOI poses questions that […]

NECA Washington Watch

TRS GC Docket No. 10-51 8/24/10—Late-filed comments on the NOI seeking comment on VRS rules. Replies due Sept. 2. PAH! VRS

Internet Yoga

Yoga has gone high tech.

In the last few weeks I’ve come across three different websites offering “online” yoga classes.

Core Power Yoga (click “yoga on demand”)

Yoga Today (offering “outdoor” yoga classes)

&

Jiva Diva (scroll down to “live classes”)

All three sites give free classes or trial runs. I’m seriously considering trying one out because I’m about to head to Colorado for a mountain retreat for two weeks. The last time I was on retreat I found a gem of a yoga teacher who gave 90 minute private lessons out of her home for $25 (talk about a deal!). But she’s now home-schooling her kids and doesn’t have time for another student (me).

So…I’m thinking of logging on to my computer for Downward-Facing Dog time. But after debating which site to try, I actually decided that instead of Internet classes, I am going to take this time to better develop my own home practice. Tune-in next week to see if I can recall the sequence for Sun Salutations and figure out how to move into Trikonasana (Triangle Pose) without my yoga teacher prodding me to firm my thighs. I’m looking forward to rolling out my mat by my bedside and trusting myself and my practice (okay, I might bring a book of poses for a little cheat sheet, but mostly I’ll be on my own).Š

Bring It On

I’m about to fall asleep when my husband, Ron, reaches out and shakes my shoulder.

“Are you awake?” he asks.

“Yes,” I say.

“What do you want for your birthday?”

“Hmmm,” I say. “I don’t know. Let me think about it.”

But I do know. I’m debating between various brands of juicers (Green Star or Omega – any thoughts?). Ron is going to keel over when he hears this. In the six years we’ve been together, I’ve never asked for a single item relating to the kitchen.

Not a pot.

Not a pan.

Not a knife, a spatula, or a whisk.

Growing up, I never learned how to cook. My girlfriends and I — we were women of a new generation. We were going to be doctors, lawyers, and mathematicians (and we are). There would be no time for preparing meals. (I’m not sure what our eating plan was — hired help? fast food? — we didn’t think about that part). I do vaguely recall taking a Home Economics course in high school. Men were required to take it too. We baked a pie. I stared at the aluminum container holding the crust and debated between leaving it or removing it. I wasn’t sure aluminum should go in the oven so I took it off. My pie looked more like a pancake.

People change, though.

Now I see our kitchen in a whole new light. Cooking spinach lasagna the other night, I sipped a glass of wine and turned on some tunes. I had to call my mother — twice — and ask her whether I was supposed to cook the whole wheat lasagna noodles or layer them in the dish uncooked. (The first time she said, “Cook ‘em!” and the second time she said, “Yes, I’m positive. Cook ‘’em!”) I cooked the noodles. The food was delicious. I’m no longer intimidated by the kitchen. Bring on the juicer! Š

Soul Food

It’s been raining ever since I arrived in Los Angeles. Pouring, actually. The weather reminds me of the 1997-1998 El Nino. It’s all good though. I’m here at a university working on a book project and the rain is keeping me indoors where I’m squirreled away in the library.

The last time I was out here to “work” I got a wee bit distracted and spent my days catching up with friends, visiting my old haunts, eating at my favorite places, etc. This time I’m being good.

“I picture you in a dark, dusty room all alone as you sort through archives,” my husband said to me on the phone the other day. Well, sort-of. I take the documents out of the dark, dusty room to a bigger, lighter conference room. And that’s pretty much where I’ve been the whole time – the exact same spot I was ten years ago as a grad student, typing notes on my laptop (do you ever have the feeling that you’re making no progress in life whatsoever? Anyhoo…)

Last Friday the weather channel called for rain Saturday and Sunday, so I planned to push through the weekend and continue working. But when I woke up Saturday morning, I felt sunlight on my face. I jumped up and ran to the window . . . sure enough it was a bright, shiny morning. The Pacific Ocean sparkled. I had to enjoy the sun while it lasted.

I was starving, so I gobbled down a veggie sandwich (tomato, California avocado, cucumber and sprouts on toasted whole wheat). Then I dashed to the bike path, buckled my rollerblades and – Zoom! – I was off. I bladed all the way to the end of the path, turned around and bladed back, and then turned around once again. I was like the Energizer Bunny . . . I kept going and going and going (‘cept for the part where I rounded a curve way too fast and hit an unexpected pile of sand).

It was the best. The veggie sandwich was certainly a tasty beginning to the day. But I tell ya, its sunshine that feeds my soul.

Do I Knead a Bread Machine?

Bread.

The staple of life.

Now that I’ve gotten used to making my own fresh vegetable juice, I’m thinking of bread. I recall reading Animal, Vegetable, Miracle a few months ago and coming across a passage by the author’s husband (Steven Hopp) who makes a fresh loaf practically everyday.

He says, “I know you’ve got one around somewhere: maybe in the closet. Or on the kitchen counter, so dusty nobody remembers it’s there. A bread machine.”

A bread machine? Nope, don’t have one in the closet or on the counter or anywhere. I’m lucky if I can find a spatula in our kitchen. During a party this spring, I was talking with the host’s mother. She’s in her late 80s and makes her own bread. I told her I wanted to learn so I could make homemade pizza dough, whole wheat, pumpernickel, etc.

“But I don’t have a bread machine,” I said.

She practically fell out of her chair laughing. I guess if you really know how to make bread the old fashioned way, you knead the dough. By hand. For a long time.

“You have to feel the dough to make sure it’s right,” she said.

Call me crazy, but kneading dough by hand actually sounds fun. I think I’ll try it (although I have no idea what it’s supposed to “feel” like, so I’ll have to wing that part). In the meantime, I’ll keep my eye out at garage sales for someone else’s barely-used, dusty bread machine.

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