Tag Archives: NTID

NTID News – November 8, 2010 Students, faculty and staff from RIT/NTID visited Bayer Material Sciences headquarters near Pittsburgh as part of the company’s Disability Mentoring Day. What do aspirin, bowling ball coatings and fertilizer have in common? They’re all produced by Bayer Corp., the U.S. subsidiary of Bayer AG, a global company with $30 […]

For Immediate Release                                     Contact: “Life After High School” Discussions Planned for Deaf Students and Their Teachers Sept. 10, 2010 – (DENVER, Colo.) – High school students who are deaf or hard of hearing and their parents will get ideas about life after high school at FutureQuest, a FREE one-day conference offered […]

Sgt. Tony Wallace Remembered

NTID News – September 1, 2010 Lexis Wallace, 12, and her father, Sgt. Tony Wallace, together in Ohio during a visit this summer. Sgt. Anthony Wallace was living his dream, working as a police officer in Alaska for the past four years. A Hall of Fame wrestler while attending Rochester Institute of Technology and the […]

NTID News – August 24, 2010 Tara Thorn, a graduate of NTID’s American Sign Language interpreting program, chats with a deaf man in Haiti during a visit in June. Thorn will return to Haiti this week where she hopes to open a school for deaf children. A graduate of NTID’s American Sign Language and Interpreting […]

NTID News – June 23, 2010 “Baby Dolls,” by Tiarra Hopson of Little Rock, Ark., won best photo illustration in the 2010 Digital Arts, Film and Animation Competition for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students.

Global Collaboration Strives to Break Stereotypes NTID News – June 21, 2010    Yohei Sasakawa, chairman of The Nippon Foundation of Japan, has provided funding for PEN-International since 2001. He spoke at the opening of the Technology and Deaf Education Symposium at RIT/NTID today. Photo by Mark Benjamin, NTID.

Student Focused on His Future

James DeCaro Inducted into RIT’s Innovation Hall of Fame NTID News – May 3, 2010    NTID Interim President James J. DeCaro was inducted in the inaugural class of RIT’s Innovation Hall of Fame. See full-size photo NTID Interim President James J. DeCaro was one of 10 prominent men and women inducted into the inaugural […]

RIT ANNOUNCES CAMP FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS WITH HEARING LOSS ROCHESTER, N.Y. (April 30, 2010) -African-American, Latino American and Native American students with hearing loss who are entering 7th, 8th, or 9th grade are invited to Steps to Success, a career exploration weekend camp August 6 – 8 at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical […]

In the Beginning

Thanks to all who have stopped by and/or left comments as the Wasa blog gets underway.

A couple people mentioned that this blog has inspired them to try yoga. I know the feeling. My husband inspired me to try yoga years ago after I watched him ease into a backbend with grace. I’ve mentioned that before, but what I failed to mention was the fact that I didn’t like my first yoga class. Or my second. Or third;

I knew the benefits of yoga – flexibility, awareness, inner stillness – were practices I needed in my life, but during class I couldn’t hold the poses. It takes time to find balance and build strength. Also, the teacher wasn’t a good fit. Plus, I kept slipping on my mat because I was wearing socks. Not to mention my loose-fitting t-shirt flipped over my head when I’d bend over for Downward Facing Dog.

So my first suggestion is to wear comfortable “stretchy” clothes. Slip off your shoes (and socks) before entering the studio. Bare feet help you “stick” to the mat. If you don’t have a mat, you can rent one. Sometimes they’re free, sometimes $1.

Okay, now you’re in the studio before class has begun. Believe it or not this can be the most intimidating part.

A few years ago I remember encouraging a friend to try a yoga class. We were traveling in San Francisco and the class was at 6am. I couldn’t attend because of another obligation (um, I believe it was sleep), but my friend was a super early riser and decided to try yoga for the first time. Ten minutes later she clamored back into the room complaining that when she walked in the studio all the students were gathering foam blocks, long white straps, and bolsters, and she had no idea what these were, if she needed any, and, if so, which ones she should take.¼br />

Oh gosh, I felt awful for sleeping in. I had completely forgotten how many times I’ve felt that exact same way when I’ve tried something new. Like the first time I tried a spinning class. I was standing in the cool dark studio when a group of women walked in all holding biking shoes (biking shoes? Oops! I didn’t have those). Then they began turning knobs, lowering the seats, and adjusting the handlebars. I was outta there in 30 seconds (I went back the next day – it turns out you don’t need biking shoes and the instructor showed me how to adjust the parts – but still).

Even just a few weeks ago I tried a new yoga studio and noticed the students folding blankets in a manner I’d never seen before. I’ve been practicing yoga for years and I still felt a bit out of place. I wasn’t sure if I should fold the blanket “my” way or “their” way. That question was answered when the teacher began class and showed everyone what she wanted us to do.

So, a few more suggestions: don’t worry about the blocks, straps, and blankets. They are props to help people (like me) adjust in certain poses. If you need a prop during a pose, the yoga teacher will bring it to you, or you can ask her before class begins. Also, consider brining a friend to your first class if that would make you feel more comfortable (a friend who has practiced before can show you the ropes; if not, you two can navigate the waters together).

Now class has begun . . . and you don’t understand a word the teacher is saying. Chaturanga Dandasana? Urdhva Mukha Svanasana? Virabhadrasana II? The same thing happened to me in a dance class once where the teacher was using terms I’d never heard. The students around me began spinning and hopping and twirling about as I stood there, motionless and a little annoyed (it was a “beginners” class). Finally I gave up and tried to sneak out of the room. A woman came over and touched me on the shoulder, “You just don’t know the lingo yet. You’ll get the hang of it,” she promised.

And I promise – you’ll get the hang of yoga lingo. I do, however, recommend finding an “intro to yoga” course if you’re trying it for the first time. After trying yoga and not liking it, I finally went to this 2-day orientation at Yoga Works. Instead of jumping right into sun salutations, we sat in a circle and talked. The teacher showed us how to breathe, answered our questions, and walked us slowly through the fundamental poses. That’s when yoga began to change to my life.

Wasa with Feta, Cherry Tomatoes and Red Onion

Ingredients

1 tablespoon red onion, sliced thin
2 tablespoons crumbled reduced-fat feta cheese
2 leaves fresh basil
¼ cup cherry or grape tomatoes cut in half
2 pieces WASA Fiber Rye Crispbread (may substitute other WASA Crispbread flavors)

Directions

Place tomatoes on cracker.
Sprinkle with feta cheese. Top with onion and basil and serve.

Tip: substitute fresh mozzarella or goat cheese for feta cheese

Prep time: 10 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 54
Total Fat 2 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Cholesterol 7 mg
Sodium 141 mg
Total Carbohydrate 7 g
Dietary Fiber 3 g
Protein 3 g
Calcium 6% of daily value

Use Fluconazole Treatment for Fungal Infections

There are different types of infections and each type requires a particular form of treatment.  For fungal infections, you need to use antifungal drugs for its treatment.  If you develop such an infection, fluconazole treatment is necessary, as fluconazole is an effective antifungal drug that can help greatly in the treatment of fungal infection.  Fluconazole treatment works great against these forms of infection as the treatment property of the drug helps in purging the infection effectively out of the body.  Through the use of fluconazole treatment for fungal infections, you will be able to effectively and efficiently get rid of the infection from your system. Read more…

Man in the Mud

Panic.

It’s a “sudden overwhelming fear, with or without cause, that produces hysterical or irrational behavior” according dictionary.com.

I’ve certainly been guilty of it. But it usually doesn’t serve me well. Like the time I convinced myself I had appendicitis and went into such hysterics that I passed out.

I came across this story last week – a construction worker in China was buried alive in the mud with nothing but a gap of air in front of his face (his helmet slid down). He didn’t panic. He practiced meditation and survived two hours on an amount of air that should have lasted five minutes.

I wonder sometimes how I would react in certain situations. What if I was eating in Windows restaurant at the top of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11? What if I was in one of the hijacked planes? I don’t think a person truly knows how he or she will respond unless in the situation. God willing, that will never be the case, but if it is, I hope I am like the man in the mud.

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