Tag Archives: OBIT

Dr. Victor Henry Galloway, who was the first Deaf superintendent of the Texas School for the Deaf during the 1980′s, was also the first Deaf superintendent of the Scranton State School for the Deaf in Pennsylvania from 1979 – 1981.  He died on January 16, 2013 in Austin, Texas.  He was survived by his wife, Mrs. […]

Obit: Former Deaf School Teacher

Damaris Jean (Thompson) Copperud died unexpectedly on July 19, 2012 at her home in Oakland. She was born in Minnesota, and she received her master’s degree from Gallaudet in Washington, D.C.  She taught at the California School for the Deaf (Berkeley and Fremont) for 40 years.  After she retired in 1986, she pursued her hobbies, […]

Lupe Ontiveros, an actress, died July 26 of liver cancer at age 69.  Her memorial service was open to the public. Ontiveros, a former social worker, is best known for her roles in the films “Selena,” and “Real Women Have Curves,” and a recurring role in TV’s “Desperate Housewives.” Since two of her sons and […]

Obituary – George W. Johnston Jr George William Johnston Jr. passed away on Wednesday, May 9, 2012, in Haven Hospice at JFK Medical Center in Edison, N.J. Family and friends are invited to attend the visitation on Saturday, May 12, 2012, from 1 to 3 p.m. and 5 to 7 p.m. in the McCriskin-Gustafson Home […]

Deaf Sports Leader 11/25/2011 Clyde D. Wilson, 91, a graduate of the Ohio State School for the Deaf, founded, led and/or participated in softball, basketball and bowling organizations for hearing impaired athletes. According to the obit in the Akron Beacon Journal, Wilson founded the Tri-State Deaf Softball Association Tournament in 1940. From 1942 to 1944 […]

Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, NY) Written by James Goodman Staff writer Joan Stone knew how to bring out the best in people. During the 13 years she served as interim dean and…

In Loving Memory of Dr. Lawrence (Larry) Forestal “…in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count, it’s the life in your years.” — Abraham Lincoln Dr. Lawrence (Larry) Harold Forestal, 71, passed away on May 11, 2011 after a sudden illness. He was born and raised in Asbury Park, New Jersey […]

West River, MD SHIRLEY JORDAN, 76, RETIRED GALLAUDET UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR Shirley Cranwill Jordan, 76, passed away at home on March 30, 2011. Shirley was born on April 11, 1934 in Pennsylvania but moved as a young child to Flint, Michigan, where she grew up on the campus of the Michigan School for the Deaf, moving […]

James N. Freehof, 81 James N. Freehof, architect and creator of program to organize drawings, dies

Obituary: Jason Wister Ammons

In Memoriam- Jason Wister Ammons “A true Southern gentleman who knew no enemies”

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The Practice of Pause

In the most recent issue of Newsweek magazine, Robert J. Samuelson wrote a column titled The Sad Fate of the Comma.

He says:

I have always liked commas, but I seem to be in a shrinking minority. The comma is in retreat, though it is not yet extinct. In text messages and e-mails, commas appear infrequently, and then often by accident (someone hits the wrong key). Even on the printed page, commas are dwindling. Many standard uses from my childhood (after, for example, an introductory prepositional phrase) have become optional or, worse, have been ditched. If all this involved only grammar, I might let it lie. But the comma’s sad fate is, I think, a metaphor for something larger: how we deal with the frantic, can’t-wait-a-minute nature of modern life. The comma is, after all, a small sign that flashes PAUSE. It tells the reader to slow down, think a bit, and then move on. We don’t have time for that. No pauses allowed.

My husband came home from work a few hours after I read the article and mentioned that a yoga instructor had visited his office as part of their Wellness Program.

“Did you learn anything?” I asked.

He said he learned that if people took ten minutes out of their day to sit quietly and relax, scientific studies show stress levels reduce drastically. In other words, he learned it’s important to pause.

He had a worksheet from the Mind/Body Medical Institute. Click here for the full set of instructions, but in a nutshell it simply says to sit in a comfortable position, close your eyes, and breathe (the easy part), as you clear your mind of active thoughts (the hard part).

Summers seems like an especially good time to incorporate the practice of pause because schedules can get so busy. You might be thinking: “That’s precisely the problem. I’m so busy I don’t have time to relax for 10 minutes.” But as the yoga instructor who visited my husband’s office mentions on her website, pausing will calm you down and clear your mind for better decision-making, ultimately giving you much more time.     Š

Happy

The other day, I was in a “blah” mood due to my seasonal affective disorder (self-diagnosed). To snap out of it, I came up with a list of ten activities that are fun. Not just enjoyable, but playful and lively. The kind of activities that make me happy, happy, happy.

10 Fun Activities
1. Rollerblading (I can’t help but grin like a fool whem I blade – I absolutely love it more than just about anything)
2. Dinner out with my husband
3. Waterskiing
4. Downhill Skiing
5. Watching a good romantic comedy
6. Tennis
7. Jumping on a trampoline
8. Throwing a Frisbee with my dog (she can leap in the air and catch it)
9. Riding rapids in a river
10. Snorkeling around coral reefs

Reviewing my list, it dawned on my how many were linked to physical activity – things that get my blood flowing. (Yoga isn’t on there because while I do enjoy it – love it, actually – I think of it as more of a calming practice.) I don’t know where the trampoline came from – that one just popped into my head. Well, I’m so getting a mini tramp for my bedroom. When it’s cold and windy and rainy I’ll get some physical exercise and make myself laugh while I’m at it.

Bounce. Bounce. Bounce. Š

Natural Sugars

So, I’m off to see a naturopath. I’m still trying to figure out the fertility thing, and I’d like to learn more about this healing method of treatment. Diet is the first thing a naturopath evaluates (I think) – so it should be interesting to hear what she thinks of my eating habits. My no coffee, no alcohol, and increased intake of fruits and vegetables seems to be going okay (sure, there’s hiccups along the way, but not too many). But the no sugar plan? That’s tough. I’m off it, then back on it. Off. On. Off. On. OffOnOffOnOffOnOffOn. Lately, in order to satisfy my cravings, I’ve been snacking on a little sweet treat in the late afternoons (mostly chocolate). Sugar depresses the immune system drastically. And after reading up on the potential harm sugar can do to my body (feed cancer cells, contribute to autoimmune diseases, weaken eyesight, and so on) I actually felt fear rising inside me. But while fear can be a strong motivator, what really moves me into action is knowing how healthy and healed and clean I’ll be and feel when I eliminate sugar from my diet. I already know the next step. Instead of satisfying my craving with candy, I should switch to treats that have been sweetened with natural sugars, like maple syrup and raw honey. Okay . . . back to the kitchen to experiment with more recipes.

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