Tag Archives: theatre

The California School for the Deaf at Fremont is presenting a play called “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.”  The high school drama club will perform this play on May 2, May 3, and May 4th.  Some of the shows will be voice interpreted.  

Deaf West Theatre is having a gala honoring Ed Waterstreet, who has been their artistic director since Deaf West Theatre was founded in 1991.  The event will occur on Saturday, February 9, 2013 at Kirk Douglas Theatre in Culver City.        

The Center Theatre Group in Los Angeles has an accessibility project called “Project D.A.T.E.“  Project D.A.T.E. stands for Direct Access Theatre Experience.  Those performances are provided for deaf, hard of hearing, and low-vision people attending their performances.  They provide sign language interpretation, audio descriptions, and open captions for some of their performances.    

Many movies in theatres are not accessible to deaf and hard of hearing people.  This month, advocates for deaf and hard of hearing people are urging movie theatres to provide captions for movies.  An online press room has been set up to provide information about this captioning campaign.  The campaign is sponsored by the Collaborative […]

The IRT Theater Deaf Emerging Artists Festival (D.E.A.F.)

National Theatre of the Deaf Returns To Eugene O’Neill Theater Center 5/23

Baby Green Salad with Dates, Walnuts and Wasa

Ingredients

1 package (4 ounces) mixed baby salad greens
1 cup fresh dates, chopped
1 tablespoon oats
1 cup toasted walnuts, coarsely chopped
3 tablespoons canola oil
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
Salt to taste
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
6 pieces Wasa Multi Grain Crispbread

Directions

Coat dates by rolling in oats to prevent sticking together. Set aside.
Place mixed greens in a salad bowl. Add walnuts, dates, canola oil, red wine vinegar, salt and pepper.
Toss greens and serve as salad with crumbled Wasa Crispbread pieces or spoon onto individual whole crispbreads.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serves 2

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 255
Total Fat 15 g
Saturated Fat g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 86 mg
Total Carbohydrate 25 g
Dietary Fiber 5 g
Protein 6 g
Calcium 3% of daily value

Walking Barefoot

I’m at the BlogHer conference in downtown Chicago mingling with 800 other women (promise I’ll link to some great food and yoga blogs once I process all the info that’s pouring into my brain).

The first day, I decided to get some exercise by walking from the train station to the conference center. I was wearing sandals and carrying a heavy laptop bag. I got lost. One hour and five blisters later, I finally arrived. I was smart enough to take a cab back to the train station that night, but once I made it to the suburbs (where I’m staying with a friend) I had to walk another mile to their house. My friend’s husband, Brad, was with me, and he watched as I limped and cringed.

“Ow, ow, ow,” I said as my sandals rubbed against my blisters.

I slipped off my shoes.

“Ow, ow, ow,” I said again as the sharp little pebbles on the roads and sidewalks cut my feet.

“You’re a yoga blogger!” Brad said.

“What does that have to do with anything?” I asked.

“Some yogis walk over hot coals and stuff,” he pointed out.

Now that he mentioned it, I did recall reading a passage in a book about firewalking at a yoga retreat. Although none of the yoga classes I’ve attended have involved hot coals, we do practice in bare feet. Still, smooth wood floors and soft sticky mats may help strengthen my soul, but they don’t sturdy up the skin on my soles.

Walking home that night, I stepped off the sidewalk and onto the grass. It was long and cool and damp. It cushioned my bare feet and brushed in between my toes. I completely forgot about my blisters as I focused on how nice it felt to observe the world through from the bottom up. It had been a long time since I’ve walked barefoot in the grass.

To some, barefoot hiking is a hobby. Richard Frazine wrote a book about it called The Barefoot Hiker, and Common Ground, a sustainable living magazine, wrote an article about it here.

How often do we take time to feel the crunch of leaves or the slick slime of moss or the powder puffs of dirt through our feet and toes? Not to mention walking barefoot is gentle on the planet. I think I will start taking off my shoes more often, especially outside.

As quoted on this website, Sitting Bull said:  “Healthy feet can hear the very heart of Mother Earth.”

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